philosophy of history

(redirected from Philosopher of history)

philosophy of history

  1. critical and methodological reflection on the nature of HISTORY and HISTORIOGRAPHY.
  2. large-scale speculative historical theories, claiming general laws or asserting general tendencies seen as operating throughout history. The philosophy of history in this second sense, influential especially in the 18th- and 19th-centuries (e.g. HEGEL), has on the whole gone out of fashion in the 20th-century See also HISTORICISM, GRAND NARRATIVE AND METANARRATIVE.
References in periodicals archive ?
The great English philosopher of history, Collingwood, [10] (1889-1943), warned against what he called 'scissors and paste' history.
Spengler looked upon himself as a philosopher of history, and Redner does not dispute that.
Empiricism, though at least some speculative philosophers of history have claimed to have been "empirical" (Marx and Hegel claimed to start with the definite "facts" of human history), is not the modus operandi of the speculative philosopher of history.
Military Academy at West Point--makes a bid to join the conservative tradition of German refugee, philosopher of history, and political thinker Eric Voegelin (1901-1985).
In "War and the Making of History: The Case of Mexican California, 1821-1846," Michael Gonzalez's distinctive historical voice spotlights him as a philosopher of history as well as scholar.
Philosopher of history Herbert Butterfield (1900-1979) generally focused on Europe in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, the era of revolution and reaction.
The philosopher of history, Arnold Toynbee, in analyzing the demise of a civilization, spoke of the different ways a culture responds to challenge.
While there are at least two outstanding introductory texts already available (Eugene Webb's Eric Voegelin: Philosopher of History and Ellis Sandoz's The Voegelinian Revolution, both published in 1981), Federici's work is distinctive in two ways.
The next was during the time of the philosopher of history Giambattista Vico, historian Ludovico Muratori, and social critic Pietro Giannone, who attacked the corruption of the Church and died in prison, in the first half of the eighteenth century.
This peripatetic, mid-fourteenth century North African was both a model public servant and a philosopher of history.
Collingwood, arguably the most influential English-speaking philosopher of history of the present century, many of whose conclusions directly challenge Murphey's own.
Bloom also makes a compelling case for Shakespeare as the first philosopher of history, eager to know how the "permanent problems of human nature" are colored by the "typical circumstances of their particular place.