Philostratus

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Philostratus

(Flavius Philostratus) (fĭlŏs`trətəs; flā`vēəs), fl. c.217, Greek Sophist. From a famous literary family in Lemnos, he settled in Athens in later life. His works include Life of Apollonius of Tyana (a philosopher) and Lives of the Sophists.

Philostratus

 

the name of four Greek writers who lived in the second and third centuries A.D. and were representatives of the second, or new, sophistic movement. The surviving works include the dialogue Nero by Philostratus I, The Life of Apollonius of Tyana, Lives of the Sophists, Imagines, the dialogue Heroicus, and an anthology of fictitious love letters by Philostratus II the Elder, an exhortation on the epistolary style by Philostratus III the Lemnian, and the anthology Imagines by Philostratus IV the Younger.

PUBLICATIONS

Philostratorum et Callistrati opera. Compiled by A. Westermann. Paris, 1878.
In Russian translation:
Filostrat (Starshii i Mladshii): Kartiny. Moscow, 1936. (Translated by S. P. Kondrat’ev.)
Pamiatniki pozdnei antichnoi poezii i prozy II-V v. Moscow, 1964. Pages 233–50.
Pamiatniki pozdnei antichnoi nauchno-khudozhestvennoi literatury II-Vv. Moscow, 1964. Pages 168–77.
Pamiatniki pozdnego antichnogo oratorskogo i epistoliarnogo iskusstva II-V v. Moscow, 1964. Pages 143–52.
References in periodicals archive ?
(7) Segundo Philostratos (de arte gymnastica libellus VII, 18), a salpinx anunciava a proclamacao do vitorioso, antecedendo a concessao do premio.
The author of the Acts of Thomas passes on the opportunity to use these kings as models of uncivilized barbarians, something that Philostratos does not hesitate to do (in the Life of Apollonios 3.26ff.) with at least one Indian king, and we have seen the case of the dangerous Indian king Psammis in Xenophon's tale.
"Fata libelli: Das Schicksal der 'Gemalde' des alteren Philostratos." In W.
It is clear that much of the description of events at the ceremony in the Aithiopika is drawn from Philostratos' account of the cult of Protesilaos in the Troad in his Heroikos (esp.
/ And words that flew about our ears like drifts of winter snow," Menelaus is a terse, simple, and honest speaker whose chief rhetorical skill resides in the parrhesia, or forthrightness, that Odysseus forgoes in favor of demotes speech--the vehement, formidable, or oblique oratorical style with which he is associated by ancient literary critics including Aristotle, Demetrius, and Philostratos (80).
(74.) Both Aelian (NA 5.17) and Philostratos (Gymnasticus 17) indicate that women were excluded from watching the games, but make no exceptions for unmarried women.
The Greek writer Philostratos (circa 190AD) wrote of mosaics showing hunting and domestic scenes.
Most of them are leading figures in one or another trade or profession (running the whole gamut from Meton the engineer and Antimachos the banker down to Philostratos the pimp), and it is striking that all the occupations are different: Sporgilos is the only barber referred to, Thearion the only baker, and so on.
Wytse Keulen discusses in one chapter the Latin novels by Petronius, Apuleius and the anonymous History of Apollonius of Tyre, and in another Philostratos' Life of Apollonius of Tyana.
Ubersetzung, Kommentar und Interpretationen zum Heroikos des Flavios Philostratos, Bari: Levante editori.