Philostratus


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Philostratus

(Flavius Philostratus) (fĭlŏs`trətəs; flā`vēəs), fl. c.217, Greek Sophist. From a famous literary family in Lemnos, he settled in Athens in later life. His works include Life of Apollonius of Tyana (a philosopher) and Lives of the Sophists.

Philostratus

 

the name of four Greek writers who lived in the second and third centuries A.D. and were representatives of the second, or new, sophistic movement. The surviving works include the dialogue Nero by Philostratus I, The Life of Apollonius of Tyana, Lives of the Sophists, Imagines, the dialogue Heroicus, and an anthology of fictitious love letters by Philostratus II the Elder, an exhortation on the epistolary style by Philostratus III the Lemnian, and the anthology Imagines by Philostratus IV the Younger.

PUBLICATIONS

Philostratorum et Callistrati opera. Compiled by A. Westermann. Paris, 1878.
In Russian translation:
Filostrat (Starshii i Mladshii): Kartiny. Moscow, 1936. (Translated by S. P. Kondrat’ev.)
Pamiatniki pozdnei antichnoi poezii i prozy II-V v. Moscow, 1964. Pages 233–50.
Pamiatniki pozdnei antichnoi nauchno-khudozhestvennoi literatury II-Vv. Moscow, 1964. Pages 168–77.
Pamiatniki pozdnego antichnogo oratorskogo i epistoliarnogo iskusstva II-V v. Moscow, 1964. Pages 143–52.
References in classic literature ?
A scholiast renders `giving eight mouthfulls'; but the elder Philostratus uses the word in contrast to `leavened'.
In Alphonso's Clericalis Disciplina a serpent was mentioned with eyes of real jacinth, and in the romantic history of Alexander, the Conqueror of Emathia was said to have found in the vale of Jordan snakes "with collars of real emeralds growing on their backs." There was a gem in the brain of the dragon, Philostratus told us, and "by the exhibition of golden letters and a scarlet robe" the monster could be thrown into a magical sleep and slain.
The site where he stayed was later discussed by the Sophist, Philostratus, in his book Life of Apollonius where he recounts his journey to India and the significant places that he saw - around one-and-a-half century after the travels of Apollonius.
Other texts are divided into fewer categories, for example, the testimonies of Philostratus, Life of Sophists I.10.1-4 (= DK80A2), Hesychius, Onomatol.
Philostratus' Lives of the Sophists, depicts the 'philosopher-sophist' to be distinguished from the real sophist; they are not explicitly classed as a hybrid of form, however are certainly ranked in a different class as the proper sophists (V.S.
Girard cites myths from nations across the world that involve hidden sacrifice and in which scapegoats emerge as gods, including Claude Levi-Strauss's Ojibwa and Tikopia tales in his Totemism, Euripides's The Bacchae, and Philostratus's Life of Apollonius of Tyana, as well as Inca and Hindu practices, Romulus and Oedipus, and many others.
(26.) This is also appears to be true in regard to some texts associated with the myth of Polyphemus and Galatea; see Vasiliki Kostopoulou, "Philostratus' Imagines 2.18: Words and Images," Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies 49 (2009): 81-100, esp.
72.45a28 [Bekker]), while Philostratus adds to this account the details that the stone is elusive but sheds a brilliant light (VA 3.46.10-18).
Here is the story Keats read in Burton's book in its larger context (he printed at the end of the poem, as a note to the last line, the fragment quoted here starting "Philostratus in his fourth book" and ending "in the midst of Greece"), so that we may get a glimpse into the larger picture that lingered in his mind regarding love between a supernatural (a lamia/serpent-woman) and a natural being (man):
According to Jefferson (Christ the Miracle Worker, 112) in late Antiquity and until the rise of Christianity, Hercules "was revered less as a god and more as a divine helper and occasionally as a defender against disease." A number of ancient authors, including Philostratus, Pausanias, and Ovid wrote about Hercules' healing powers, and shrines and temples were erected in his honor for people seeking cures.