Philostratus

(redirected from Philostratus the Elder)

Philostratus

(Flavius Philostratus) (fĭlŏs`trətəs; flā`vēəs), fl. c.217, Greek Sophist. From a famous literary family in Lemnos, he settled in Athens in later life. His works include Life of Apollonius of Tyana (a philosopher) and Lives of the Sophists.

Philostratus

 

the name of four Greek writers who lived in the second and third centuries A.D. and were representatives of the second, or new, sophistic movement. The surviving works include the dialogue Nero by Philostratus I, The Life of Apollonius of Tyana, Lives of the Sophists, Imagines, the dialogue Heroicus, and an anthology of fictitious love letters by Philostratus II the Elder, an exhortation on the epistolary style by Philostratus III the Lemnian, and the anthology Imagines by Philostratus IV the Younger.

PUBLICATIONS

Philostratorum et Callistrati opera. Compiled by A. Westermann. Paris, 1878.
In Russian translation:
Filostrat (Starshii i Mladshii): Kartiny. Moscow, 1936. (Translated by S. P. Kondrat’ev.)
Pamiatniki pozdnei antichnoi poezii i prozy II-V v. Moscow, 1964. Pages 233–50.
Pamiatniki pozdnei antichnoi nauchno-khudozhestvennoi literatury II-Vv. Moscow, 1964. Pages 168–77.
Pamiatniki pozdnego antichnogo oratorskogo i epistoliarnogo iskusstva II-V v. Moscow, 1964. Pages 143–52.
References in periodicals archive ?
The character of Zephyr, and the transmogrification of the story into Zephyr killing Hyacinth out of jealousy, comes not from Ovid, Apollodorus, or Hyginus, but from Palaiphatos, (16) Lucian, (17) Philostratus the Elder, (18) and Philostratus the Younger.
Philostratus the Elder, Philostratus the Younger, and Callistratus.
As we have said, Philostratus the Elder made recourse to many literary texts.
Philostratus the Elder, Imagines; Philostratus the Younger, Imagines; Callistratus, Descriptions.
Gods and Painters: Philostratus the Elder, Stoic Phantasia and the Strategy of Describing.
From Philostratus the Elder to the modem criticism initiated by Diderot, we indeed find famous questions directed at the people who are depicted: 'Que signifie ce b[hat{c}]cher sun lequel gisent des victimes [acute{e}]gorge[acute{e}]es' (II, 30), [1] asks Philostratus of one of his paintings.
English edition: Philostratus The Elder, The Younger, Imagines, translation by A.
The process by which such an association could have occurred to Milton involves two principal elements, A Midsummer Night's Dream and the Imagines of Philostratus the Elder, Book II, image 12, in which the legend about Pindar and the bees is told.
Rather, my specific focus here, in trying to theorize some of the psychodynamics of ekphrasis, will be on its rhetorical forms, as prescribed in the so-called progymnasmata (trainee-orators' handbooks), and as exemplified above all in the Imagines of Philostratus the Elder.