Phlegmatic


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Related to Phlegmatic: Phlegmatic temperament

Phlegmatic

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Phlegmatic is the traditional name for the personality temperament indicated by an excess of the element water.

References in classic literature ?
No sign of astonishment appeared on Emil's phlegmatic face.
One of them, who bore the character of a profound observer, laid down as his opinion that this young man, so phlegmatic in appearance, must in reality be very dangerous, as under this icy exterior he was sure to conceal an ardent desire to avenge his friends, the De Witts.
He was phlegmatic, stolid to such a degree that one could not but wonder how the Revolution had any meaning to him at all.
Back In Power revealed how much phlegmatic control the band had over their gonzo anthems without wielding the axe to sheer meltdown and First Floor signed off the rock rumblings to explosive effect.
But Eriksson was phlegmatic as ever when asked about his job prospects although he conceded the possibility of him being axed grows larger the longer he remains in charge.
His exceptional musicality, flexibility, and powerful legs made him an ideal instrument for George Balanchine, who made the male solo in the Phlegmatic section of The Four Temperaments on him, as well as the Sarabande solo in Agon.
Few men take more of a pounding on this page than Mellor (ok, one - Bates), but he was fairly phlegmatic about it all.
Farmer Tony Martin - who is serving a prison sentence after shooting two burglars who broke into his home - was described as 'phlegmatic but disappointed' yesterday after losing the latest stage of his fight to clear his name.
The Newmarket trainer was phlegmatic about having to wait longer than usual for his first two-year-old winner, pointing to having a team of youngsters that need at least a mile.
The West becomes the land of the Phlegmatic, spiritual but weak.
But he was phlegmatic as ever when asked about his job prospects although he conceded the possibility of him being axed grows larger the longer he remains in charge.
A quartet for Fucik, Jaworski, Kent, and Macavinta, Humours delves into the four temperaments--sanguine, phlegmatic, choleric, and melancholic--but it does little more than to restage them on the dancers' bodies in broad, cartoonish strokes.