Caspian Seal

(redirected from Phoca caspica)

Caspian Seal

 

(Phoca caspica), a mammal of the family Phocidae of the order Pinnipedia. It measures 120–148 cm long and weighs 30–60 kg. The color of the body varies highly with each individual and changes with age: from white in the newborn to yellow and grayish brown with brown and dark spots in the adults. The Caspian seal lives only in the Caspian Sea. In the fall it migrates to the northern part of the sea where it gathers in large numbers on ice (breeding ground), gives birth, and molts. In the spring it returns to the south. It feeds primarily on trash fish. The Caspian seal is important in the seal-hunting industry (its fur, hide, and fat are used). Because of unrestrained trapping (about 100, 000 animals per year), its numbers have declined. There are an estimated 600, 000 seals remaining (1970).

References in periodicals archive ?
The 2000 canine distemper epidemic in Caspian seals (Phoca caspica): pathology and analysis of contributory factors.
Elevated concentrations of trace elements in Caspian Seals (Phoca caspica) found stranded during the mass mortality event in 2000.
Also, male seals may aggregate close to mature females nursing their pups and wait until mating occurs; such a reproductive behavior strategy has been demonstrated, for example, for the Caspian seal (Phoca caspica; Wilson et al., 2012).
Elevated concentrations of trae elements in Caspian seals (Phoca caspica ) found stranded during the mass mortality events in 2000.
Serological evidence of transmission of human influenza A and B viruses to Caspian seals (Phoca caspica).
Thousands of Caspian seals (Phoca caspica) died in the Caspian Sea from April to August 2000.
During the spring of 2000, high death rates were reported in Caspian seals (Phoca caspica) (1), which live only in the Caspian Sea and are listed as a vulnerable species by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (2).