Phocis

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Phocis

(fō`sĭs), ancient region of central Greece. It included Delphi, Mt. Parnassus, and Elatea; Boeotia (now Voiotía) was on the east, and the Gulf of Corinth was on the south. After the First Sacred War of c.590 B.C. ("sacred" because it involved the oracle of Delphi), Phocis lost control of Delphi to a council of states. With Athenian help Phocis regained (457 B.C.) hold of Delphi, thus precipitating the Second Sacred War. Early in the next century Phocis passed under Theban control. The Third Sacred War (355–346 B.C.) began with Phocis trying to reestablish itself and ended with the victory of Philip IIPhilip II,
382–336 B.C., king of Macedon (359–336 B.C.), son of Amyntas II. While a hostage in Thebes (367–364), he gained much knowledge of Greece and its people.
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 of Macedon, who thereby became arbiter of Greece.

Phocis

 

a district in central Greece.

At least 22 cities are known to have existed on Phocian territory in antiquity. Of these, the most famous were Delphi and Elatea. The Panhellenic sanctuary of Apollo and the oracle of Delphi were located in Phocis. This circumstance, along with the region’s economically and strategically advantageous location, involved the Phocians in the struggles of the tribes and city-states of ancient Greece. Little is known of the internal history of Phocis prior to the fourth century B.C. The Phocians belonged to the Delphic-Pylaean amphictyony and took part in a number of Sacred Wars.

In modern Greece Phocis (Fokis) is a nome; it includes part of the territory of the ancient district.

Phocis

an ancient district of central Greece, on the Gulf of Corinth: site of the Delphic oracle
References in periodicals archive ?
Garland recounts the experiences of various peoples who moved to avoid being conquered such as the Phocaeans, who Herodotus clearly celebrated for preserving their freedom or "Greekness" which was more of a "state of mind" than an attachment to certain buildings or a locale (p.
The ancient Phocaeans, faced with a quite moderate Persian demand for a token submission, took to the sea and lived as pirates before some of them went to their daughter city, Marseilles, and others went to Italy and founded Elea, a city that gave birth to Parmenides, the founder of systematic philosophy.
It's architecture and ambiance is a glorious hotchpotch of influences from the Phocaeans, Romans, the kings of Majorca and the counts of Roussillon.
He urges mass migration, on the example of the Phocaeans, who left their territory to boars and wolves (lupis, 20).