Phocis


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Phocis

(fō`sĭs), ancient region of central Greece. It included Delphi, Mt. Parnassus, and Elatea; Boeotia (now Voiotía) was on the east, and the Gulf of Corinth was on the south. After the First Sacred War of c.590 B.C. ("sacred" because it involved the oracle of Delphi), Phocis lost control of Delphi to a council of states. With Athenian help Phocis regained (457 B.C.) hold of Delphi, thus precipitating the Second Sacred War. Early in the next century Phocis passed under Theban control. The Third Sacred War (355–346 B.C.) began with Phocis trying to reestablish itself and ended with the victory of Philip IIPhilip II,
382–336 B.C., king of Macedon (359–336 B.C.), son of Amyntas II. While a hostage in Thebes (367–364), he gained much knowledge of Greece and its people.
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 of Macedon, who thereby became arbiter of Greece.

Phocis

 

a district in central Greece.

At least 22 cities are known to have existed on Phocian territory in antiquity. Of these, the most famous were Delphi and Elatea. The Panhellenic sanctuary of Apollo and the oracle of Delphi were located in Phocis. This circumstance, along with the region’s economically and strategically advantageous location, involved the Phocians in the struggles of the tribes and city-states of ancient Greece. Little is known of the internal history of Phocis prior to the fourth century B.C. The Phocians belonged to the Delphic-Pylaean amphictyony and took part in a number of Sacred Wars.

In modern Greece Phocis (Fokis) is a nome; it includes part of the territory of the ancient district.

Phocis

an ancient district of central Greece, on the Gulf of Corinth: site of the Delphic oracle
References in periodicals archive ?
Similar to the oath of allegiance between Athens and Phocis, Churchill supported a diplomatic guarantee between England and Poland stipulating that, if attacked, England would support the Polish resistance.
Total quantity or scope: 49 types of bus small, large, MD passenger (eg taxis) for transfer students the A / primary and secondary / tertiary education in schools spatial regional unit Phocis jurisdiction (section 1 has 13 routes, part 2 has 11 routes and section 3-49 are one way) .
According to him (10.8.1-5) the Ainians, together with the Ionians, Dolopes, Thessalians, Magnesians, Malians, Phthiotians, Dorians, Phocians and Locrians who border on Phocis, had constituted the original League.
Spartan military allies] met for a banquet, [and] a man from Phocis sang
Pottery of LH IIIB2 character was also locally produced in Phocis. (120) Group B deep bowls occur.
A call went out from certain quarters to have the city razed, and Erianthus, the Theban, gave his vote to pull down the city, and turn the country into sheep-pasture; yet afterwards, when there was a meeting of the captains together, a man of Phocis, singing the first chorus in Euripides's Electra, which begins "Electra, Agamemnon's child, I come/ Unto thy desert home" they were all melted with compassion, and it seemed to be a cruel deed to destroy and pull down a city which had been so famous, and produced such men.
More elaborate, and so more informative, is an account of what befell a young man appointed priest at a shrine in Phocis of Heracles `the woman-hater' (403F-404A).
He then focuses on select monasteries for nearly the remainder of the book, including Saint John's at Patmos, Ossios Loukas in Phocis, Daphni in Attica, and Mistra in the Peloponnese.
The lesson had long been learned in Greece that the cultivation of Roman favour could be a powerful weapon in the competition for political pre-eminence at home,(83) and the mass deportations which followed Pydna had shown just how efficiently political opponents could be removed after a war by means of allegations of unfriendliness toward Rome.(84) Fabius's acceptance of the role of adjudicator no more implies or exemplifies a permanent and legally defined subjection of Greece to Roman supervision after 146 than do Flamininus's jurisdiction in Phocis during the winter of 195/194, M.
It lay in the territory of Phocis on the steep lower slope of Mount Parnassus.
Septimius during the fourth century,(18) Dictys, though agreeing on the whole with the account in the Epic Cycle, puts much more emphasis on the role of Crete: Atreus is the son of Minos, and he dies in Crete; Menelaus is in Crete when Paris visits Sparta and abducts Helen; Orestes seeks refuge with Idomeneus in Crete and leaves from there for Athens and Phocis, eventually to avenge his father; Menelaus stops in Crete with Helen on his return from Egypt and is informed of Orestes' situation; Idomeneus later reconciles a difference between Menelaus and Orestes, and Menelaus then promises Orestes his daughter Hermione.
Under considerable provocation, he counterattacked and killed his father, who was riding a coach at the crossroads of Phocis, and who was at that time anonymous to Oedipus.