Phomvihane


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Phomvihane

Kaysone . 1920--92, Laotian Communist statesman; prime minister of Laos (1975--91); president (1991--92)
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The first are the political reports presented by Secretary-General Kaysone Phomvihane to the third and the fourth Congresses of LPRP, which has ruled the LPDR since 1975.
In this respect, the LPDR's policy, as postulated by Lao Prime Minister Kaysone Phomvihane, set conditions for cooperation with the United States in the search for MIAs so long as Washington "abandon acts of intervention into internal affairs of the country".
A year before the joint statement was issued, indicative gestures aimed at improving relations with the United States became apparent in the LPDR's policy on the solution to the POW/MIA issue announced by Kaysone Phomvihane at the Fourth Party Congress in 1986.
14) Kaysone Phomvihane, The Third Congress of the Lao People's Revolutionary Party, April 27-30, 1982; Documents and Materials (Moscow: Progress Publishers, 1983), pp.
In the caves of the revolutionary leaders such as Kaysone Phomvihane and the "red prince" Souphanouvong, information plates tell the narrative of the brave Lao multi-ethnic people and their patriotic leaders fighting against foreign aggression.
While the Vietnamese had already put their secret Communist organisation in place under the loyal control of Nouhak Phoumsavan and Kaysone Phomvihane, the idea was to first establish a 'progressive' constitutional monarchy to win over mass support more effectively to the revolutionary cause.
Kaysone Phomvihane, the late President of the Lao PDR and celebrated at present in Laos as the inspirational figure of the regime, called for greater attention to be paid to promoting education among ethnic groups, improving their living conditions and increasing production in remote minority areas.
37) Kaysone Phomvihane, La revolution lao (Moscou: Editions du Progres, 1980), p.
172), and partly to the simple fact that the leader of the Lao revolution, Kaysone Phomvihane, could not hope to fill the 'structural space' once occupied by the king.