phonograph

(redirected from Phonographs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to Phonographs: phonography

phonograph:

see record playerrecord player
or phonograph,
device for reproducing sound that has been recorded as a spiral, undulating groove on a disk. This disk is known as a phonograph record, or simply a record (see sound recording).
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Phonograph

 

a household device for the reproduction of sound from a phonograph record. A phonograph differs in principle from a gramophone; it converts the mechanical vibrations of the needle in the sound pickup to electrical oscillations, which are then amplified by an audio-frequency amplifier and converted to sound by an electroacoustic system, which includes one or more electrodynamic loudspeakers.

Phonographs are designed to reproduce monophonic, stereophonic, or quadraphonic disk recordings. The sound quality and the convenience of use depend on the phonograph’s rating. For example, phonographs manufactured in the USSR according to the All-Union State Standard, which establishes the basic technical specifications (for example, range of frequencies reproduced and nonlinear distortion factor), are rated as superior, first class, second class, or third class. Modern superior-rated phonographs produce sound of such quality that the listener is completely unaware of noise and the various distortions that occur in the course of reproduction of disk recordings; such phonographs are the most convenient to use.

REFERENCES

Apollonova, L. P., and N. D. Shumova. Mekhanicheskaia zvukozapis’. Moscow-Leningrad, 1964.
GOST 11157–74. Elektrophony: Obshchie tekhnicheskie usloviia. Moscow, 1974.

S. L. MISHENKOV

phonograph

[′fō·nə‚graf]
(engineering acoustics)
An instrument for recording or reproducing acoustical signals, such as voice or music, by transmission of vibrations from or to a stylus that is in contact with a groove in a rotating disk.

phonograph

1. an early form of gramophone capable of recording and reproducing sound on wax cylinders
2. US and Canadian a device for reproducing the sounds stored on a record: now usually applied to the nearly obsolete type that uses a clockwork motor and acoustic horn

phonograph

An earlier term for an analog recording and playback device. See phonograph record, turntable and LP.
References in periodicals archive ?
The apprehensive Spectator author longs for a strategic version of forgetting to help refine and enhance depictions of human character, but neither phonographs nor lyrics seem able to grant it.
Bostwick in his book, The American Public Library (1910), in which he cites the use of phonograph records in his support for the circulation of music in any format, which was seldom done at the time:
Later phonographs featured flat platters and vinyl recordings that lasted far longer than wax.
An Edison phonograph of 1905 was sold by retailer W Newton of Westgate Road, a Colombia gramophone of 1906 to Sherborne's of Westmorland Road and a 1940s Vidor wireless and gramophone to the Windows store.
Central to his thesis is what he calls the "phonograph effect," discernible effects that sound recording has had upon music and music making.
Kittler's Gramophone, Film, Typewriter (1999), the functions of film and phonograph can be distinguished by analogy with the psychoanalytic functions Jacques Lacan described as the "imaginary" and the "real." Where the imaginary was once stimulated, in the era of the book, by the discrete flow of words, in the age of media it is directly controlled by the cinema's manipulation of attention through techniques like the close-up, the zoom, and shot/countershot alternations.
Coleman tells us about many such technologies and shakeups: home phonographs and radios that sealed the fate of player pianos and sheet music in the 1920s, '30s, and '40s; the invention of the long-playing record in the late '40s and multitracking in the '50s, which created space for unified 40-to-50-minute works of musical recording art; the late '70s introduction of portable cassette/earphone devices that elevated the cassette to the best-selling recorded-music format in just six years; the electronic synthesizer of the '80s that drove out of business many of Petrillo's boys who somehow had managed to survive the onslaught of canned music in the first half of the 20th century.
He took it to the Edison Bell Com-pany, a leading phonograph manu-facturer, but they rejected it saying: ``Dogs don't listen to phonographs.'' A warmer reception awaited at the Gramophone Company, later to become EMI, who paid pounds 100 to acquire the painting and t he copy-right, the equivalent of pounds 6,200 today.
And as a passionate collector myself of (among other things) Edison phonographs, I must also admit to being such a person.
In the late 1890s coin-operated phonographs using cylinders were the order of the day.
In Northampton today, phonographs and old wind-up gramophones are attracting enthusiasts from all over the country for the City of London Phonograph and Gramophone Society's Phonofair 2001.
One contribution of the new survey is the information it provides retailers on consumers' use of framed phonographs as part of home decorating.