phoresy

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Related to Phoretic: commensals

Phoresy

A relationship between two different species of organisms in which the larger, or host, organism transports a smaller organism, the guest. It is regarded as a type of commensalism in which the relationship is limited to transportation of the guest.

phoresy

[′fȯr·ə·sē]
(ecology)
A relationship between two different species of organisms in which the larger, or host, organism transports a smaller organism, the guest.
References in periodicals archive ?
The presence of a specific phoretic on carrion can confirm the presence of its specific carrier at some point in time, even when the carrier is no longer present (Perotti and Braig 2009).
Deep phylogeographic breaks were detected in some phoretic species (Wilcox et al.
The findings of the present study on the ecology and behavior of these arachnids will contribute to a better understanding of the structure of phoretic interactions in the Caatinga of Brazil and stimulate future studies on pseudoscorpions.
Phoretic association between Nanocladius (Plecopteracoluthus) sp.
Two of the Mesostigmata were found in the phoretic deutonymphal stage (Poecilochirus carabi, Uroseius sp.), while the remaining three were adults (Dendrolaelaps sp., Gaeolaelaps sp., unidentified Uropodidae).
Parasitic and phoretic arthropods of sylvatic and commensal white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) in central Tennessee, with notes on Lyme disease.
Abstract--Distribution and prevalence of the phoretic barnacle Xenobalanus on cetacean species are reported for 22 cetaceans in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean (21 million [km.sup.2]).
However, coyote-badger associations are most likely phoretic rather than a form of social symbiosis (Kiliaan et al.
An ultra-thin Electro Phoretic Display (EPD) watch that can be worn like a wrap-around on the wrist was on display, and is slated to be commercialized by Epson holding company Seiko.
Interspecific competitors include other beetles (chiefly Scolytidae, Buprestidae, and Cerambycidae) and phoretic microorganisms.
Zooplankton (especially rotifers) have been commonly considered to be cosmopolitan and to disperse readily by aerial or phoretic transport of cysts, resting eggs, ephippia, or diapaused organisms (e.g., King 1980, Brown and Gibson 1983, Wetzel 1983, Pennak 1989, Begon et al.