Phrack


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Phrack

(PHReak hACK) A popular online magazine (e-zine) for hacker information that began in 1985 on a BBS. Later shut down and then resurrected, Phrack editors decide which submissions should be published. Although number 63 was supposed to be its last issue, Phrack 69 was released in May 2016. See phone phreaking and hacker.


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Over the years, Phrack has published articles that have become widely used by computer security professionals. (Image courtesy of Phrack, Inc., www.phrack.com)
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Here, for example, is The Mentor explaining the formation of a hacker in the essay that first appeared in Phrack (1985) as "The Conscience of a Hacker": But did you, in your three-piece psychology and 1950s techno-brain, ever take a look behind the eyes of the hacker?
Members of the cyber constabulary had regarded Phrack as a toxic spore pod for some time before they came upon a means to shut it down.
government of fraud and interstate transportation of stolen property regarding a document published in his electronic newsletter, Phrack. The trial began on July 23, 1990, and ended suddenly four days later when the government dropped the charges.
At 16, he and a childhood friend started an electronic newsletter called Phrack. The name was composed from the words phreak and hack, which refer to telecommunications systems (phreaking) and computer systems (hacking).
Phrack published 30 issues from November 1985 through 1989.
This document, which was in the form of a computer text file, had been published in Issue 24 of Phrack. During this visit, Neidorf, believing he had done nothing wrong, cooperated and turned over information.
The indictment centered on the publication of the E911 text file in Phrack. The government claimed the E911 text file was a highly proprietary and sensitive document belonging to BellSouth and worth $23,900.
Denning asserts that although Phrack's publication of information from E911 may have been improper, it was still protected by the First Amendment as free speech.
Denning writes, "...articles in Phrack provided information that could be useful for someone trying to gain access to a system or free use of telecommunication lines." These are euphemisms for breaking into others' computers and engaging in toll fraud.
The author reports that publishing criminal methods in Phrack has been compared with publishing the Pentagon Papers in the New York Times and claims the publications should be accorded the same protection.
The author states that, "Phrack appears to encourage people to explore system vulnerabilities." This is another euphemism for taking advantage of vulnerabilities in other people's computer systems by breaking into them and violating their privacy.
The fourth area of disagreement is how we should treat young people who break into systems or publish magazines like Phrack that allegedly promote criminal activity.