Phrase Book


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Phrase Book

 

an elementary aid for communicating in a foreign language in common real-life situations. Phrase books may be bilingual or multilingual. The language material selected for inclusion in such books consists of individual words, complete sentences, phrases, and fragments of connected text. The material is arranged thematically by situation. Foreign translations are provided either in the conventional writing system or by means of a simplified transcription based on the alphabet of the language of the person for whom the phrase book is intended.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Basic Spanish for Orientation and Mobility: A Phrase Book and Dictionary is a well-organized, easy-to-use reference guide for orientation and mobility specialists.
Another War Department composition against which the September Technical Manual 603 might be balanced was published between it and the January Italian Phrase Book just mentioned--that is, in June of 1943.
com and CoolGorilla introduce talking phrase books for mobiles(C)1994-2007 M2 COMMUNICATIONS LTD http://www.
This handy phrase book lists hundreds of idiomatic expressions useful for teaching any grade level.
He also published A New Method of Chess Notation (1857), A Shakespeare Phrase Book (1881), and A New and Complete Concordance to Shakespeare (1894).
RUTH Davidson stole Donald Trump's election phrase book as she said Tories will "make Britain great again".
It's a phrase book, but gives the other person an opportunity to say something back.
At least Star Trek fans could swot up on an alien tongue with a Klingon (Vulcan) phrase book at Nottingham Riverside.
I don't have a 'manager of the year' trophy to sit and polish, or indeed a phrase book of unfathomable cliches, so I can't speak from a position of tactical authority - but the fact is we are dull and predictable.
The Birmingham phrase book includes: Allroyt (hello), taraarabit (goodbye), bostin (brilliant), kippertae (cup of tea), mowta (car), safta (this afternoon), loik (like), wozapanin (what's happening), mardy (grumpy), moine (mine), cob (bread roll).
So it looks like either I order a Swedish phrase book or get my gardening gloves on.
This in my view is Labour rhetoric straight out of the anti-Tory stock phrase book.