Phrygian cap


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Phrygian cap

presented to slaves upon manumission. [Rom. Hist.: Jobes, 287]
See: Freedom
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
You can debate Space Force all you want, but whatever the new logo is, you can bet your cuirass it won't have a mizzen, dexter fluke, Phrygian cap or esponton.
of Patients Normal Anatomy 17 Accessory cystic artery 2 Phrygian cap 1 Common duct stones 0 REFERENCES
The pileus-like Phrygian cap of late antiquity, named for its alleged origins in central Turkey, remained the standard hat of non-elite European males into the Middle Ages.
As with the Genin or the Phrygian cap, the gesture of covering the head can also be a device to display authority or political viewpoint, so by covering their heads, Kershaw invites the viewer to speculate as to the rich meaning of each headdress.
Also, since incense was imported from Arabia, the Queen of Sheba was an appropriate character to choose, as the smoke could emanate from her Phrygian cap. Two carved ivory icons depicting the koimesis (Dormition of the Virgin) (cat.
Her other accoutrements, which appear together in various combinations in different pictures--a crown of laurels, wings, torch, sword and, most important, the distinctive Phrygian cap or bonnet-have a long history in French visual culture, high and low.
What are these nudists up to.) Because the young man is wearing a Phrygian cap, we recognize him as the Trojan prince Paris.
In a further example from 1793, 'La liberte' stands with club, laurel crown, Phrygian cap in hand, and the dead serpent of inequity or tyranny at her feet.
It is sometimes called the Phrygian cap. The god Mithra wore a cap like that, and then in Rome so too did freed slaves, so it entered into the romantic classicism of the American and French revolutions as a non-monarchical symbol, often with the clasped hands--the foi--signifying fraternity.
Admiral Smyth described it as "gathered somewhat in the form of a Phrygian cap; followed by a crescent of stragglers," an image unlikely to leap to mind.
Thus, Nadaud was drawn to republicanism following the Revolution of 1830, became acquainted with the socialist and associative doctrines of the day, kept up with politics and even took to wearing an old-fashioned phrygian cap as a sign of fidelity to the revolutionary cause.
Herzen, who did not hide his sympathies for Socialism, called on his Russian friends to remember that the "Phrygian cap" or the red banner are little different from the "blood-stained" sword of the ruling class.