Phrygian cap


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Phrygian cap

presented to slaves upon manumission. [Rom. Hist.: Jobes, 287]
See: Freedom
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of Patients Normal Anatomy 17 Accessory cystic artery 2 Phrygian cap 1 Common duct stones 0
Given its revolutionary symbolism, the Phrygian cap might be called a winter hat that became a playhat, a hat with significance.
Also, since incense was imported from Arabia, the Queen of Sheba was an appropriate character to choose, as the smoke could emanate from her Phrygian cap.
Her other accoutrements, which appear together in various combinations in different pictures--a crown of laurels, wings, torch, sword and, most important, the distinctive Phrygian cap or bonnet-have a long history in French visual culture, high and low.
Because the young man is wearing a Phrygian cap, we recognize him as the Trojan prince Paris.
In a further example from 1793, 'La liberte' stands with club, laurel crown, Phrygian cap in hand, and the dead serpent of inequity or tyranny at her feet.
Thus, Nadaud was drawn to republicanism following the Revolution of 1830, became acquainted with the socialist and associative doctrines of the day, kept up with politics and even took to wearing an old-fashioned phrygian cap as a sign of fidelity to the revolutionary cause.
We have known Marianne as a soldier, with a shield or with a naked breast, wearing a Phrygian cap or a laurel wreath, Marianne as a middle class shrew or waving the red flag, a depoliticized Marianne, part of a national popular culture, borrowing Brigitte Bardot's face--or, more recently, that of Laetitia Casta, a Victoria's Secret model.
It will be rather like a cream-coloured Phrygian cap without the floppy bit at the top.
The seal's motto, "Archives de la Republique francaise", framed a woman dressed in an antique robe, with fasces in her left hand and "holding, in her right hand, a pike topped with a Phrygian cap, the bonnet of liberty".
One of the figures in the group wears a Phrygian cap, which was the symbol of Turkey.
When a slave was manumitted by the Romans, a small Phrygian cap, usually of red felt, called pile us , was placed on his head; he was termed libertinus ( " freeman " ), and his name was registered in the city tribes.