Phrynichus


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Phrynichus,

fl. 430 B.C., Athenian comic poet. Fragments of his works, of the Old Comedy, survive.

Phrynichus

(frĭn`ĭkəs), fl. c.510–476 B.C., Athenian dramatist, considered by some ancients (including Plato) to be the founder of tragedy. His historical play, The Taking of Miletus, which concerns the capture of Miletus by the Persians, had such a painful theme that it moved the Athenian audience to tears, and Phrynichus was fined. He is said to have been the first to use female characters and was famous for his choreography. Fragments of his dramas survive.
References in classic literature ?
The demagogues are of two sorts; one who flatter the few when they are in power: for even these have their demagogues; such was Charicles at Athens, who had great influence over the thirty; and, in the same manner, Phrynichus over the four hundred.
(73) At this point, in contrast to later embassies led by Antiphon and Phrynichus themselves, the leaders of the Four Hundred may have feared that they might be viewed as revolutionaries by the Spartans and be arrested, so they refrained from taking part themselves.
Reproductive behavior, spermatophores, and female genitalia in the whip spiders Damon diadema (Simon, 1876), Phrynichus cf.
Thus, in 493 BCE, the playwright Phrynichus, whose tragedy The Fall of Miletus had caused the audience to break into tears of pity for the Ionians killed and the shame of having abandoned them, was fined one thousand drachmas for commemorating Athens' unsuccessful foreign policy.
Myth was of course the primary ingredient of tragedy, but we must bear in mind that also 'oriental' stories could make their way to the scene: think of Phrynichus' Persai and Fall of Miletus, of Aeschylus' Persai, or of the anonymous fourth-century tragedy on Gyges and Kandaules.
I shall not go into any details; suffice it to say that he, like Nietzsche, situates the origin of tragic art and theater in ancient Greece, but, in contrast, basically attributes it to three plays provoked -- or allegedly provoked -- by the Persian Wars: namely, The Fall of Miletus (which is not extant) by Phrynichus, The Persians by Aeschylus, and Antigone by Sophocles.
It is only when those norms become inoperative that the reader finds it difficult to develop a firm grasp of the moral character of such figures as Alcibiades and Phrynichus, who dominate the final books of the History.
A good measure of Athenian alarm is what happened to the playwright Phrynichus when in the following year he presented what was probably the first-ever historical drama on the Athenian stage, The Capture Of Miletus.
Aristophanes' flair for such jokes may have been rivalled by Phrynichus'.(2) Phrynichus fragment 27 (= schol.
Where, for example, Sommerstein's commentary gives full notes on Cleophon (678) or Phrynichus (689), Dover offers less documentation.
Orwin shares Thucydides' admiration for Phrynichus, the enemy of Alcibiades in 411, but reduces Thucydides' praise of the Five Thousand to a disapproval of the excesses of democracy and oligarchy.
The dramatists Cratinus, Phrynichus, and Eupolis also wrote plays of this type.