phycobilisome


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phycobilisome

[‚fī·kō′bil·ē‚sōm]
(biochemistry)
A light-harvesting structure containing aggregates of photosynthetic accessory pigments that is located on the surface of thylakoid membranes in all cyanobacteria and red algae.
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LCM is responsible for anchoring the phycobilisome complex to the thylakoid membrane, which is the structural unit of the grana (stacks of thylakoid membranes) containing the chlorophyll in cyanobacteria (Figure 3B).
of Maryland), recounts her journey from war torn Europe to the US and tells how the opportunities afforded by the flexible US educational system led her to collaborative algal plant research and the elucidation of phycobilisome structure.
1997, "Phosphorelay control of phycobilisome biogenesis during complementary chromatic adaptation, Photosynth Res, 53, pp 95-108.
This ultimately results in altered synthesis of phycocyanin and phycoerythrin, the pigmented phycobiliproteins that make up the rods of the phycobilisome.
New high-value stable isotope products were also introduced late in the year and the Company recently initiated sales of its phycobilisome pigment products.
In cyanobacteria the major light harvesting antenna consists of a supra-molecular protein-chromophore complex known as phycobilisome, which is anchored onto the cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane from the cytoplasm.
Mercury induces alteration of energy transfer in phycobilisome by selectively affecting the pigment protein, phycocyanin, in the cyanobacterium, Spirulina platensis.
Their topics include phycobilisomes from cyanobateria, applying genetic tools to cyanobacterial biotechnology and ecology, the status and potential of cyanobacteria and their toxins as agents of bioterrorism, whether or not cyanobacteria in microbial mats can really degrade crude oil, bioluminescence reporter systems for monitoring the gene expression profile in cyanobacteria, a preliminary survey of the economic viability of large-scale photobiological hydrogen production using cyanobacteria raised in marine environments, and advances in marine symbiotic cyanobacteria.
Large aggregates of phycoerythrins can be prepared by covalent linkage (10) or by chemically stabilizing naturally occurring phycobilisomes, a naturally aggregated form of phycoerythrin isolated from algae, and the aggregates conjugated to binding proteins to produce reagents with very high fluorescence response (11, 12).
Phycobilisomes are photosynthetic antennae complexes of red algae and cyanobacteria (1-3).