late blight

(redirected from Phytophthora infestans)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Phytophthora infestans: potato blight

late blight

[′lāt ¦blīt]
(plant pathology)
A fungus blight disease in which symptoms do not appear until late in the growing season and vary for different species.
References in periodicals archive ?
Syngenta is donating sequence information on nearly 18,000 individual genes expressed at key stages in the life-cycle of Phytophthora infestans as well as most of its genomic sequence to GenBank, a publicly available DNA database.
There is concern over the appearance of new strains of fungus, specifically Phytophthora infestans, that cause the late blight disease and which triggered the Irish potato famine of the 1840s.
An important fungal disease in the United States is late blight of potatoes caused by the fungus, Phytophthora infestans.
A fungus called Phytophthora infestans (called A1 for short) caused the Irish potato famine of 150 years ago.
Late blight disease, caused by Phytophthora infestans, may be remembered forever for bringing about the Irish potato famine in 1845-46 in which 1,000,000 people died and another 1,000,000 emigrated to avoid starvation.
A large international team of researchers recently published the 240-megabase DNA sequence of Phytophthora infestans, a robust parasitic water mold responsible for the Irish potato famine of the 1840s, in Nature (1).
For example, at ARS's Small Grains and Potato Germplasm Research Unit in Aberdeen, Idaho, geneticist Rich Novy and plant pathologist Jonathan Whitworth spearhead a program to develop new potato lines that are resistant to different biotypes of the late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans.
A wide-ranging pathogen, Phytophthora infestans by name, killed our plants.
Wales is a high-risk area for blight - phytophthora infestans - and the recent humid and thundery weather coupled with high night-time temperatures, humidity and frequent showers has resulted in scattered infections.
With the blight-resistant gene in hand, the Wisconsin team, which also includes Jiming Jiang, a UW-Madison professor of horticulture, was able to engineer plants that survived exposure to the many races of Phytophthora infestans.
Blight is caused by various strains of the funguslike organism Phytophthora infestans, which thrive under warm, moist conditions.