Piano nobile


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Related to Piano nobile: rustication

Piano nobile

The principal floor of a great or noble house, usually containing state rooms on the first floor above the ground or basement.

piano nobile

In Renaissance architecture and derivatives, a floor with formal reception and dining rooms; the principal story in a house, usually one flight above the ground.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tortelli's villa, with a courtyard partially surrounded by a two-storey loggia, new piano nobile rooms, and a monumental stair, fits into a pattern of villeggiatura by popes and prelates.
This floor, or piano nobile, has no beginning, end, or even clear sequence.
This takes you up to the oak-panelled piano nobile, where there are two cafeterias and a conference room, separated by glazed doors that can slide away to create a large space for receptions.
The piano nobile was a huge salon, presumably stretching from one side of the Palazzo to the other.
With copious examples and descriptions of Florentine buildings, Burroughs proceeds into the fifteenth century and examines the emergence of the piano nobile as an area dedicated to reception and representation, surmounting a service floor.
107) By 1674, the ring, which was kept in a portable wooden altar, had been moved to a bedroom on the piano nobile.
The father-and-son collaboration will remain on exhibition for two weeks at Birmingham's Number Nine Gallery, in Brindleyplace, before moving to the Piano Nobile gallery, in Richmond, Armada Gallery, in Plymouth and Piers Feetham Gallery, in London's Fulham Road.
Gracefully decorated with flowers and birds, it was probably created for the piano nobile of a grand palazzo.
The building 'sits riding sidesaddle', as Valerie Mulvin puts it, with its short end and piano nobile entrance addressing" the edge of Fellows Square.
It has a palatial interior, a piano nobile with frescos by Giovan Zelotti and famed formal gardens set in 66 acres.
Ten years later Isaac de Caus published a series of plans of Wilton, and from these plans it is very clear that the four compartments which lay underneath the windows of the piano nobile were parterres de broderie(86) [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 12 OMITTED].
David Boyd Haycock is the curator of 'Paul Nash: Watercolours, 1910-1946' at Piano Nobile, London (9 October-22 November).