Piasts

Piasts

 

a Polish princely and royal dynasty.

The legendary founder of the dynasty was a peasant wheelwright named Piast. The first historically verifiable prince of the Piast dynasty was Mieszko I (c. 960–992). His son Bolesław I the Brave adopted the title of king in 1025. Although the royal line came to an end in 1370 with the death of Casimir III, the Piasts continued to rule in the appanage principalities—in Mazovia until 1526 and in Silesia until 1675. During the 17th and 18th centuries, at the time of the elective monarchy, a native Polish candidate to the throne was called a piast.

References in periodicals archive ?
For von Guttner-Sporzynski, the Christianisation of Pomerania by the Piasts during this period was an important factor in the change of concept.
von Guttner-Sporzynski, Darius, Poland, Holy War, and the Piast Monarchy, 1100-1230 (Europa Sacra, 14), Turnhout, Brepols, 2014; hardback; pp.
In his recent monograph, Darius von Guttner-Sporzynski traces the evolution of the concept of holy war and its change into crusading, within the context of the reign of the Piast dynasty in Poland, from 1100, to the settlement of the Teutonic Order within the borders of Poland and Prussia, in 1226.
These two chapters also describe the introduction of Christianity into Poland, and that religion's substantial influence on the Piast realm and its culture.
Curie-Sklodowska U., Lublin, Poland) explores the origins of the Western European perception of Slavs as inferior by taking as a case study German writing about Poles in the formative years of the oldest Piast state, between 963 and 1034.
Wiszewski offers an extensive analysis of the history of the rule of the Piast dynasty in medieval Poland, offering in depth discussion of the documents and narrative sources of the history, and delving into issues of memory and tradition to be found in these sources.