Pic du Midi Observatory

Pic du Midi Observatory

 

a French scientific institution located in the Pyrenees near the summit of the Pic du Midi. Founded in 1881 as a meteorological observatory, it became affiliated with the University of Toulouse in 1903. Its chief instruments are 38-cm twin and 60-cm refracting telescopes, 102-cm and 200-cm (under construction) reflecting telescopes, and 20-cm twin and 26-cm coronagraphs. Its areas of research include the photographing of the planets, the moon, and binary stars with high—up to 0.2”—angular resolution and of the surface of the sun with resolution up to 0.3”, observations of the solar corona outside of eclipses, the construction of astronomical instruments, and atmospheric optics.

References in periodicals archive ?
These representations of the albedo features recall some of the more detailed studies previously made at Pic du Midi Observatory.
Using the high-sensitivity NARVAL spectropolarimeter installed at the Bernard-Lyot telescope at the Pic du Midi Observatory in France, a team of astronomers detected the effect of a magnetic field (known as the Zeeman effect) in the light emitted by Vega.
Scientists at the world-renowned Pic du Midi observatory in the Pyrenees say light from surrounding cities is preventing them from getting a good look at the heavens.
The researchers used instruments on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope atop Hawaii's Manna Kea and the Bernard-Lyot Telescope at the Pic du Midi Observatory in France to record the polarization of light from the star and the magnetic splitting of spectral lines.
Brunier, an award-winning science journalist, and Lagrange, who is director of research at the French National Council for Scientific Research (CNRS), begin with a history of telescopes, followed by profiles of 36 land-based observatories, including the Pic du Midi Observatory in France, the Cerro Tololo Observatory in Chile, the Parkes Radio Observatory in Australia, and the Narayangaon Interferometer in India.
9) For a map based upon visual and photographic observations made at the Pic du Midi observatory during 1942-'44 on the basis of the 88-day period, see G.
17 at the Pic du Midi Observatory in Bagneres-de-Bigorre, France, showed them close together but distinct.