picaresque

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picaresque

of or relating to a type of fiction in which the hero, a rogue, goes through a series of episodic adventures. It originated in Spain in the 16th century
References in periodicals archive ?
"Origins and Definitions of the Picaresque Genre." the Picaresque Novel in Western Literature: From the Sixteenth Century to the Neopicaresque, Cambridge UP, 2015, pp.
classic apologia character of the picaresque novel, that is, the
Summing up the literary projection of New World gold, Vilches notes that "the picaresque novel, Cervantes's fiction, the urban aristocratic setting of the comedia, and the post-Cervantine novella all created new ways of understanding the relative importance of persons in relation to the rising power of money by illustrating new routes of wealth while evoking nostalgia for the nonpecuniary past" (212).
One can safely say that in Ernesto Quinonez we have a continuation of the picaresque novel that is already present in the US Latino literary tradition.
In the process of eloquently evolving his thesis, Bandera challenges basal cultural readings of Mikhail Bakhtin and Michel Foucault, offers classical and modern conceptions of madness with debate of views from psychologists and sociologists, engages in the discussion of the ideas of two of the greatest Spanish cervantistas (Miguel de Unamuno and Amado Alonso), and elaborates insightful analysis of picaresque novels, pastoral novels, and of two of Unamuno's fictions (Abel Sanchez and Niebla.) Each topic is developed in such a complete fashion that it could be read as an independent essay, while, at the same time, Bandera never allows his reasoning to get disconnected from the main analysis.
Aridjis shifts the time frame of his picaresque novel to the century before that depicted in Lazarillo, and presents the hundred years during which a richly multicultural society was being actively dismantled.
Helene Willfuer, she argues, is the most melodramatic of the texts, with a narrative shaped by the Lebensideologie of the period In her analysis of Gilgi, Barndt diagnoses the heroine's crisis as a crisia of language; identifies the strategies Keun employs to convey the impression of authenticity'; and discusses Keun's refusal to take up a clear political position She shows that Keun's second novel, DGS kunstseidene Madchen, adopts a sophisticated and self reflexive aesthetic approach, betraying the influence both of the picaresque novel and of the new medium of film In this text, the New Woman heroine observes and comments on the construction of her own identity
Even more confusing is the concept of the picaresque novel. There is an LC subject heading called "Picaresque literature" which was later expanded with national qualifiers such as "Picaresque literature, Mexican" or "Picaresque literature, English".
Ulrich von Lichtenstein's thirteenth-century autobiographical work, Frauendienst (Service of Ladies), later inspired what Spanish picaresque novel?
Though brushes with death figure prominently in this picaresque novel, it teems with a joie de vivre that only the quest for a true "home" can inspire.