Picturesque movement

Picturesque movement

A reaction to the Classical Revival Style architecture that included irregularly planned landscapes, follies, grottos, and asymmetrical buildings, mostly in the Italianate style.

Picturesque Movement

A movement established by a group of architects from about 1840 to 1900, particularly in Europe, wedded to the concept that architectural ideals should look away from formal Classical architecture and instead should embrace the romanticized past. The term “Picturesque” is not indicative of a particular architectural style, but is suggestive of a number of styles or modes of architecture that were related to the romanticized past, including: Exotic Revival, Gothic Revival, Italianate style, Queen Anne style, Richardsonian Romanesque style, Second Empire style, Stick style, Swiss Cottage architecture.
References in periodicals archive ?
On your left is the deer park, admired by followers of the 1790s Picturesque Movement.
w Gr The Grade II-listed summerhouse, called the Grotto, was built in 1668 to allow artists to paint in comfort, and became famous during the Picturesque movement (1780s to 1830s).
The fifth and most picturesque movement is "Dream of a Witches' Sabbath.'' The squawking of the Eb clarinet, the beating with the wood of their bows by the violins and violas, the screeching glissandos in the woodwinds, and the dramatic changes in dynamics turn the idee fixe into a grotesque image of its former self.
Walpole was influential in the Picturesque movement; 'Every journey is made through a succession of pictures' and this applied to natural scenery and landscaped gardens alike.
The first major tour undertaken by William Gilpin, the leading theorist of the picturesque movement, was along the Wye Valley, giving rise in 1782 to Observations on the River Wye ...
away from the common haunts of Man." Famed landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted studied Llewellyn Park, adapting the Picturesque Movement's ideas for his own planned community in Riverside, Ill.
Ann Bermingham describes the picturesque movement as an "imaginative appropriation of the countryside by a class already responsible for its territorial appropriation" (Bermingham 72).
Based on exceptional powers of reading and observation, Emily's mature handling of the landscape around Cowan Bridge reflects her command of the conventions of mountain landscape description associated with the Picturesque movement. The Sublime or heightened Picturesque occurred, William Gilpin had maintained, in the mind's reflection upon moments of turbulence in nature:
This no doubt reflects the strongly literary character of the Picturesque movement itself (the landscape gardener Humphry Repton obligingly wrote an essay, replete with Picturesque theory, about every major commission that he undertook), but it is unfortunate that one or two of the contributors should have chosen to veil their thoughts in a style so opaque as sometimes to be barely comprehensible.
Apart from severely damaging the views south from long sections of the Pumlumon ridge their proposed development site also lies alongside the infant Wye, a river often linked to the C18th Picturesque Movement.
Isenstadt shows how the design of small houses became part of the architectural repertoire through the picturesque movement and particularly J.
(17) As John Dixon Hunt persuasively argues, "Ruskin's earliest tastes for architecture and landscape were formed by the picturesque movement" (193); his personal aesthetic was shaped by his fascination with ruins.