Pierce's disease

Pierce's disease

[′pirs·əz di‚zēz]
(plant pathology)
A virus disease of grapes in which there is mottling between the veins of leaves, early defoliation, and early ripening and withering of the fruit.
References in periodicals archive ?
David Appel, professor of plant pathology and Texas A&M AgriLife extension specialist, told Wines & Vines that cotton root rot has replaced Pierce's disease as the major disease of concern in the Texas Hill Country and Gulf Coast viticultural regions.
The major factor limiting production of bunch grapes in the Southern Piedmont region is Pierce's disease (PD), a lethal disease that is endemic to the Southern Piedmont and the Coastal Plains.
College Station, Texas--For decades, Pierce's disease (PD) prevented wineries from growing vinifera grapes across the southeastern United States--and was also found in California.
Dutt's original plantings succumbed to Pierce's disease in the early 1990s and had to be replaced.
Why wouldn't growers vote to renew a program that has successfully fought off diseases and vectors including Pierce's disease and the European grapevine moth while actually lowering the levy's price per ton in recent years to 75 cents?
THE ASSESSMENT ON WINE GRAPES that was initially approved by California growers in 2001 to fight Pierce's disease is up for renewal this month.
Known in the United States as Pierce's disease, it devastated massive California vineyards in the late 19th century.
For example, having DNA markers for a strong locus for Pierce's disease resistance (named Pdrl for Pierce's disease resistance 1) allowed University of California, Davis professor Andy Walker to pass through five successive "backcross cycles" confidently and quickly, to incorporate Pdrl (from wild Vitis arizonica) in a 98% Vitis vinifera background, resulting in new varieties that are resistant to Pierce's disease.
Known in the United States as Pierce's disease, it devastated California vineyards in the late 19th century.
However, in the early 1990s, widespread outbreaks of oleander leaf scorch in Southern California, followed by significant outbreaks of Pierce's disease (PD) in table, raisin and wine grapes in the Temecula Valley in the late 1990s, were linked to transmission of the causal bacterium, Xylella fastidiosa, via GWSS.
Even detection of the extremely slow-growing Xylella fastidiosa (Pierce's disease of grapes and leaf scorch of shade trees) is improved by using Bio-PCR.
Beyond cotton, piercing-sucking insects are a particular concern because they vector major plant diseases, such as Pierce's disease in grapes and Huanglongbing, also known as "citrus greening," in citrus.