Piercing

(redirected from Piercings)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

piercing

[′pirs·iŋ]
(engineering)

Piercing

 

(1) An operation in forging and stamping carried out on presses and hammers to produce a hole or depression in an item by pressing a solid or hollow piercing tool or punch into the item. Piercing may also be used in preparation for subsequent hole expansion or broaching of billets on a mandrel and for preliminary marking of a through hole to be produced by subsequent punching.

(2) An operation performed with dies using a sharp-edged punch to remove the inner burr remaining in stamped objects after marking a through hole on them.

(3) An operation in the production of seamless pipe carried out on presses using a piercing tool or on piercing mills using a mandrel to obtain hollow tubing from ingots or billets.

References in periodicals archive ?
"I feel the strict dress code changed from being smart and presentable, to suddenly being no facial piercings or tattoos."
Having a better understanding of piercing art is important for dermatologists and dermatologic surgeons because we sometimes treat the sequelae, including infection, allergic reactions from the jewelry, and keloid scars.
RSPH chief executive Shirley Cramer said: "The growing popularity of tattoos, piercings and cosmetic procedures is all part and parcel of people choosing to express themselves and their individual identity.
MRI is contraindicated for the patient with piercings unless the jewelry is removed.
She said the Regulation of Intimate Piercing and Tattooing Bill 2018 has been welcomed as it will remove rogue operators.
According to Wikipedia, by 2016, she had 9,800 piercings.
In a 2006 national survey, 24% of respondents were found to have tattoos and 14% had body piercings (Laumann and Derick, 2006).
Do check the internet for advice, even for ordinary piercings. In the malls, you have sales clerks offering earrings free with a piercing, using a 'baril.' But it turns out piercing guns are riskier when it comes to infections and botched jobs.
It's a type of dermal piercing, which is typically made up of two pieces of jewellery consisting of a flat piece of metal that sits beneath the skin's surface and a visible stud that can be changed just like any other body piercing.
Body piercing is not a new phenomenon; it has been a part of many cultures, and carries underlying meanings.
"There is a growing societal acceptance [of] body modification, like tattoos and piercings in the workplace, but that seldom secures employment," says Bradison.