Piero di Cosimo


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Piero di Cosimo

(pyĕ`rō dē kô`zēmō), 1462–1521, Florentine painter, whose name was Piero di Lorenzo. He adopted the name of his master, Cosimo RosselliRosselli, Cosimo
, 1439–1507, Florentine painter. He was one of the artists summoned to Rome by Sixtus IV to assist in decorating the Sistine Chapel. He painted The Last Supper and other subjects for it.
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, whom he accompanied to Rome in 1482 and assisted in the decorating of the Sistine Chapel. His religious works have charm, but more important are his animated mythological scenes. Commissioned by the Florentine Francesco Pugliese, he painted many works depicting life in a primitive, mythological state. Among these pictures are the Hunting Scene and the Return from the Hunt (both: Metropolitan Mus.); Discovery of Honey (Worcester Mus.); Discovery of Wine (Fogg Mus., Cambridge); and Vulcan and Aeolus (National Art Gall. of Canada, Ottawa). Other well-known works by Piero are the Death of Procris (National Gall., London) and Simonetta Vespucci (Chantilly). The influence of Leonardo da VinciLeonardo da Vinci
, 1452–1519, Italian painter, sculptor, architect, musician, engineer, and scientist, b. near Vinci, a hill village in Tuscany. The versatility and creative power of Leonardo mark him as a supreme example of Renaissance genius.
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 is evident in some of his work, including the Portrait of a Woman with a Rabbit (Yale Univ.). Piero was also well known as a designer of popular theatricals and processions.

Bibliography

See biography by R. L. Douglas (1946); S. J. Freedberg, Painting of the High Renaissance (1961).

Piero di Cosimo

 

(real name Piero di Lorenzo). Born 1462 in Florence; died there 1521. Italian painter of the Florentine school.

Piero di Cosimo was influenced by Filippo Lippi, Leonardo da Vinci, and Hugo van der Goes. His works combine a sensitivity for the poetic beauty of the world with fantastic images and refined stylization that reflected the tastes of the court (Perseus and Andromeda, Uffizi Gallery, Florence). The artist’s faithful rendering of landscape and the mannered quality of his figures also characterize his portraits (Portrait of Simonetta Vespucci, Condé Museum, Chantilly).

REFERENCE

Bacci, M. Piero di Cosimo. Milan [1966].

Piero di Cosimo

1462--1521, Italian painter, noted for his mythological works
References in periodicals archive ?
Vasari's difficulties with Piero di Cosimo were in large measure political: Piero was tainted by the fact that much of his productive life was in the 18 years when Florentine political identity was being reconstructed in the absence of the Medici.
Yet another book on Raphael or another book on Botticelli is nice, but perhaps not as needed as a really careful look at Piero di Cosimo.
It is with Piero di Cosimo il Vecchio, and his son, Lorenzo the Magnificent, that the use of diamond ring devices, both as personal and family symbols, is a visually documented occurrence.
45) It may be worth adding here that when in the mid-Quattrocento Piero di Cosimo de' Medici assumed patronage of the reliquary chapel and the tabernacle over the miracle-working image of the Annunciation on the retrofacade of SS.
Ganz documents how the perceived slights of Agnolo Acciaiuoli and Dietisalvi Neroni by Cosimo de' Medici contributed to the willingness of these two ottimati to take advantage of Piero di Cosimo de' Medici's relative weakness by attempting to reinstitute a purer, pre-Medicean form of republican government.
Ede's contributions, beginning (rather surprisingly for those who think of him solely as a modernist) with a piece on Piero di Cosimo, and Tancred Borenius on Vermeer's newly discovered Girl in a red hat, then still with Knoedler, but shortly to be purchased by Andrew Mellon.
For good measure Jeanneret throws in a bit of Leonardo, Michelangelo, Piero di Cosimo, and the pan-European Erasmus, but it seems that they are there only to provide a continental flavor.
It is in the latter dimension that the poem enters the visual culture of the late Quattroce nto: from the 1480s, it served as a source of inventions for mythological paintings by Borticelli and Piero di Cosimo.
19) The dancers were more varied in age than seems to have been the case in the Mercato Nuovo: Lucrezia Tornabuoni, wife of Piero di Cosimo de' Medici, one of her daughters, probably the elder, Bianca, then aged not quite fourteen, the latter's aunt, Ginevra di Niccolo Alessandri, wife of Giovanni di Cosimo, Laudomia di Jacopo Acciaiuoli, wife of Pierfrancesco di Lorenzo de' Medici, and "a young woman of the Strozzi family who, if she is not the most beautiful in the city, is at least surpassed by very few" (una giovane di Strozi, quale se non la piu bella di questa cita, almancho e avanzata da puoche, Buser, 348).
This work, long at the New York Historical Society and now a showpiece in the Metropolitan's collections, was inventoried in Lorenzo's camera along with marble busts of his parents, Piero di Cosimo and Mona Lucrezia, and nearby in the same camera was a pair of gilt forzieri 3 1/2 braccie long that depicted the "Triomfi del Petrarcha" (Spallanzani and Bertela, Inventario: 1992, 26-27).
95 Piero di Cosimo, Discovery of Honey, Worcester [MA] Art Museum, reproduced in detail in Barolsky, 47, fig.