Piero di Cosimo

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Piero di Cosimo

(pyĕ`rō dē kô`zēmō), 1462–1521, Florentine painter, whose name was Piero di Lorenzo. He adopted the name of his master, Cosimo RosselliRosselli, Cosimo
, 1439–1507, Florentine painter. He was one of the artists summoned to Rome by Sixtus IV to assist in decorating the Sistine Chapel. He painted The Last Supper and other subjects for it.
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, whom he accompanied to Rome in 1482 and assisted in the decorating of the Sistine Chapel. His religious works have charm, but more important are his animated mythological scenes. Commissioned by the Florentine Francesco Pugliese, he painted many works depicting life in a primitive, mythological state. Among these pictures are the Hunting Scene and the Return from the Hunt (both: Metropolitan Mus.); Discovery of Honey (Worcester Mus.); Discovery of Wine (Fogg Mus., Cambridge); and Vulcan and Aeolus (National Art Gall. of Canada, Ottawa). Other well-known works by Piero are the Death of Procris (National Gall., London) and Simonetta Vespucci (Chantilly). The influence of Leonardo da VinciLeonardo da Vinci
, 1452–1519, Italian painter, sculptor, architect, musician, engineer, and scientist, b. near Vinci, a hill village in Tuscany. The versatility and creative power of Leonardo mark him as a supreme example of Renaissance genius.
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 is evident in some of his work, including the Portrait of a Woman with a Rabbit (Yale Univ.). Piero was also well known as a designer of popular theatricals and processions.

Bibliography

See biography by R. L. Douglas (1946); S. J. Freedberg, Painting of the High Renaissance (1961).

Piero di Cosimo

 

(real name Piero di Lorenzo). Born 1462 in Florence; died there 1521. Italian painter of the Florentine school.

Piero di Cosimo was influenced by Filippo Lippi, Leonardo da Vinci, and Hugo van der Goes. His works combine a sensitivity for the poetic beauty of the world with fantastic images and refined stylization that reflected the tastes of the court (Perseus and Andromeda, Uffizi Gallery, Florence). The artist’s faithful rendering of landscape and the mannered quality of his figures also characterize his portraits (Portrait of Simonetta Vespucci, Condé Museum, Chantilly).

REFERENCE

Bacci, M. Piero di Cosimo. Milan [1966].

Piero di Cosimo

1462--1521, Italian painter, noted for his mythological works
References in periodicals archive ?
With so much recent scholarship focused on the 16th- and even 17th-century Medici Dukes, it is surprising that the book ends with the short rule of Piero di Lorenzo de' Medici in 1494.
On the marriage of Piero di Lorenzo de' Medici, ibid., 8.36, 843.
The regime of Savonarola after the expulsion of Piero di Lorenzo in 1494 restored some republican balance but the return of the Medici in the sixteenth century ensured the absolute dominance of the dynasty.