Pietas


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Pietas

goddess of faithfulness, respect, and affection. [Rom. Myth.: Kravitz, 192]
References in periodicals archive ?
EVERY DEPOSITION OR PIETA INCLUDES THE Blessed Virgin grieving the death of her son.
In this play, we see a rare glimpse at the negotiation of the terms of daughterly pietas. Recall that in the opening, the younger Pamphila was less concerned with pietas (towards her father) than with spousal duty (officium): she said they were not required to do more than what pietas advised (8).(47) Her words framed pietas negatively, as a simple obligation that need not be exceeded.
The Brothers of Romulus: Fraternal Pietas in Roman Law, Literature and Society.
In Plautus's Persa, Saturio's daughter argues with him about his plan to "sell" her, but though the daughter also uses a moral argument (355-6, 376-7) and the father objects to her lack of obedience (378), the debate does not center around pietas either explicitly or implicitly.
For Wheatley and her "various subjects," the unconditional duty to mourn becomes the American equivalent to pietas or arete in her "epic," marking participation in "American-ness." For Wheatley, to become "American" is to respond to the call to mourn and respect the other's "remains."
Though by the late eighteenth century the words piety and virtue had acquired almost exclusively religious and moral meanings, Wheatley, who had made "some progress" in her Latin studies, according to John Wheatley (Wheatley vi), must have had a knowledge of the original meanings of pietas and virtus, and the very important civic/political aspects of these terms.
At least thirty years before the Rondanini Pieta, his spiritual dejection had already found a medieval, macabre image to express itself.
What are now identified as Michelangelo's "trembling hand sonnets" form intertextually verbal analogues to the spirit of the Rondanini Pieta, an autobiographical contemplation of death in marble aspiration for freedom affirms his art's attempt at a direct with God.
It relates intimately to the Rondanini Pieta: both unfinished, both implying a cross, and both presenting a slumping image in resignation.(31)
/ Nanque Augustini ingenium, et facundia et ardens / Illa adeo pietas, atque amor ille boni / Hanc mentem inspirant, coeli de vertice, virtus / Unde hominum, unde Deum non moriatur honos." Pierio Valeriano, Coryciana, N 2v-N 3.
1512.") There is a second Latin inscription at eye level: "Vestra locum ut pietas aliquem post reddat in astris has dedit in terris Corycius statuas." ("That your pietas may reward him with a place in the stars Goritz has given these statues on earth.")
23 "Erexit superos dextra, linguaque Corytus, / Evertit superos ore Manuque Luther, / O quam diversos peperit getmania mores, / Orta uno pietas, impietas loco est, / Dii, factis si amborum humana parum esse videtis / Consilio, e meritis tollite utrumque suis." Petrus Mellinus, Coryciana, R 4.