piezoresistance effect

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piezoresistance effect

[pē‚ā·zō·ri′zis·təns i‚fekt]
(solid-state physics)
The change in the electrical resistance of a metal or semiconductor that is produced by mechanical stress.
References in periodicals archive ?
The piezoresistive effect in conductive polymer composites, particularly those filled with carbon black, has been documented as early as 1966 [8] and several proceeding studies have examined their mechanisms and applications [9-11].
To perform ultrasound measurements, electrical signals produced in a generator are converted into mechanical oscillations with frequencies in the MHz range in an ultrasonic converter (transmitter) using the piezoresistive effect (figure 1) (refs.
It is interesting to note that MEMS technology established vis-a-vis the discovery of the piezoresistive effect at Bell Laboratories in 1955 by Charles Smith is approximately the same 'age' as Integrated Circuit (IC) technology established vis-a-vis the semiconductor effect that was discovered at the same laboratory by Bardeen et al.