piezoresistance effect

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piezoresistance effect

[pē‚ā·zō·ri′zis·təns i‚fekt]
(solid-state physics)
The change in the electrical resistance of a metal or semiconductor that is produced by mechanical stress.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the following we apply similar methods to the piezoresistive effect in these devices.
We also explore the relationship between quantity and resistivity, the relationship between quality and resistivity of carbon nanotubes, and piezoresistive effect under different qualities of the same carbon nanotubes.
CPCs present the already described piezoresistive effect due to the quantum tunneling conduction that occurs when conductive particles are separated by thin insulating films.
The piezoresistive effect in conductive polymer composites, particularly those filled with carbon black, has been documented as early as 1966 [8] and several proceeding studies have examined their mechanisms and applications [9-11].
To perform ultrasound measurements, electrical signals produced in a generator are converted into mechanical oscillations with frequencies in the MHz range in an ultrasonic converter (transmitter) using the piezoresistive effect (figure 1) (refs.
Wang, "Piezoresistive effect of doped carbon nanotube/cellulose films," Chinese Physics Letters, vol.
It is interesting to note that MEMS technology established vis-a-vis the discovery of the piezoresistive effect at Bell Laboratories in 1955 by Charles Smith is approximately the same 'age' as Integrated Circuit (IC) technology established vis-a-vis the semiconductor effect that was discovered at the same laboratory by Bardeen et al.
Silicon sensors are based on a piezoresistive effect: If a strain is put on a material to bend it, its electrical resistance will change.
This intrinsic piezoresistive effect is more than an order of magnitude more sensitive to strain than the extrinsic effect - elastic stretching - that metal strain gauges rely on.
The piezoresistive effect describes the change in the electrical resistance of a material caused by the applied stress, whereas the magnetoelastic effect refers to the change in magnetization and consequent inductance of ferromagnetic materials caused by the applied stress.
Using piezoresistive effect and microelectronic technology of semiconductor silicon, they have many advantages: large output signal, high SNR (signal-to-noise), convenient circuit processing, and high frequency responses [6].
Several technologies have been developed to address almost any application and include MEMS-based approaches as well as those that use piezoelectric and piezoresistive effects. There even are accelerometers based on eddy-current measurement.