Pig

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swine

swine, name for any of the cloven-hoofed mammals of the family Suidae, native to the Old World. A swine has a rather long, mobile snout, a heavy, relatively short-legged body, a thick, bristly hide, and a small tail. The name swine is applied mainly to domestic animals, which are also known as hogs. Sometimes these are called pigs, a term which in the United States is more correctly reserved for the young animals. Boar is a term for a male domestic swine suitable for breeding, but the term wild boar is used for the common wild swine, Sus scrofa, of Eurasia and N Africa. There are no true swine native to the New World, although a similar, related animal, the peccary, is found in the deserts and rain forests of parts of N and S America. The so-called wild hogs found in parts of the United States are descendants of the European wild boar, introduced for sport hunting, or hybrid offspring of escaped domestic hogs. Widely regarded as one of the most destructive invasive species, these feral swine are a significant agricultural pest in many areas of their range and also are harmful to a range of wild bird, mammal, reptile, and amphibian species.

The wild boar may reach a height of 3 ft (90 cm) and a length of 5 ft (150 cm). It has 9-in. (30-cm) tusks and a fierce disposition. Now rare in Europe, it is still common in parts of Asia. The Eurasian wild boar is believed to have been domesticated in Anatolia c.7000 B.C. or earlier. Modern domesticated hogs appear to be descended chiefly from this wild boar, with European strains supplanting Near Eastern ones after domesticated swine were introduced into Europe, and with some much later admixture of the smaller Asian domesticated swine that originated from a different subspecies in China about 8,000–9,000 years ago. Hogs were introduced into the Americas by Columbus on his second voyage in 1493; in 1609 hogs were shipped to the Jamestown colony from England.

Economic Importance

Swine are valuable for their flesh, prepared as ham, bacon, and pork, and for their fat (lard); they also provide many other products, e.g., leather for gloves, footballs, and other articles, and bristles for brushes. Hogs are commonly grouped as meat-type or lard-type, with the former dominating the U.S. farms. Hogs are raised in nearly all parts of the United States, but the corn belt of the Midwest is the chief hog-raising area, with Iowa by far the leading hog-producing state.

A great majority of U.S. hog production has moved from open pens to enclosed, mechanized facilities. The trend is toward huge, factorylike hog farms where swine are born and bred inside structures that feed, water, and dispose of wastes while controlling ambient temperature. Though hogs will eat almost any food, modern swine feed is nutritionally balanced to produce rapid and healthy growth. Based on a mix of corn and soybeans, the feed is supplemented by minerals, vitamins, and antibiotics. The giant modern farms produce enormous amounts of hog waste; this has become of increasing concern as a potential source of water pollution.

Diseases of Swine

Hogs are probably susceptible to a greater number of diseases than any other domestic animal. Respiratory and parasitic ailments are major problems, particularly with limited exercise and lack of sunlight. With an estimated 65% to 85% of U.S. herds exposed to swine pneumonia viruses, drugs are increasingly important to the hog industry. Some swine diseases are transmissible to humans. Among them are brucellosis, trichinosis, and cysticercosis. The last two are supposedly the basis of the first food sanitation codes.

Classification

Swine are classified in the phylum Chordata, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Artiodactyla, family Suidae.

Bibliography

See J. Blakely, The Science of Animal Husbandry (3d ed. 1982); O. Schell, Modern Meat (1984).

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2022, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

Pig

The pig is a traditional European symbol of good luck and abundance. The invention of ceramic coin jars for children, traditionally made in the shape of a pig and therefore known as "piggy banks," was inspired by this symbolism. In past times this symbolism also inspired girls to wear pig-shaped charms on charm bracelets. Men once wore similar charms on their watch chains.

In many European countries a traditional Easter feast features pork (see also Lamb). Some explain this preference for pork at Easter time with reference to the pig's role as a symbol of abundance. Others, however, believe that this custom began in medieval times as a jab at the Jews for their refusal to accept Jesus as the Messiah (for more on Messiah, see Jesus). Traditional Jewish dietary laws prohibit Jews from eating pork. Christians, however, understood themselves to have been released from the obligation to follow these laws through the sacrificial death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. So they celebrated Easter by eating pork. Many Europeans still enjoy feasting on pork at Easter time. In the United States ham serves as a traditional Easter dish.

Further Reading

Myers, Robert J. Celebrations: The Complete Book of American Holidays. Garden City, NY: Doubleday and Company, 1972. Weiser, Francis X. The Easter Book. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1954.
Encyclopedia of Easter, Carnival, and Lent, 1st ed. © Omnigraphics, Inc. 2002

Pig (Boar)

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

The Pig is one of the 12 animals of the Chinese zodiac. It refers to one of the 12 earthly branches that are used in Chinese astrology, together with the 10 heavenly stems. Such a branch designates one day every 12 days: the days are named according to a sexagesimal (60) cycle, made of 10 series of 12 branches.

Kind, affectionate, scrupulous, courteous, and without problems, the Pig is a nice person—too nice, perhaps, for he may get on people’s nerves. On the other hand, this generous and peaceful person may prove to be too innocent. Fortunately, he has a lot of luck. He often is a cultured intellectual and he enjoys food. He likes nature and solitude.

—Michele Delemme

The Astrology Book, Second Edition © 2003 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Pig

 

in metallurgy, a small ingot of metal—such as pig iron, a nonferrous metal, or a ferroalloy—in the shape of a bar, usually with a contraction. Pigs are cast horizontally in a mold that is open at the top in, for example, casting machines.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

What does it mean when you dream about a pig?

Dreaming of a pig may symbolize dirtiness, greediness, or selfishness. For example, someone who overindulges in food is said to eat “like a pig,” and a dirty or slovenly person is sometimes disparagingly called a”pig.” Alternatively, the pig may represent feasting and opulence, as in banquets where the roasted pig with an apple in its mouth is the adorned centerpiece on the table. In Chinese astrology, the pig is the twelfth sign of the zodiac and symbolizes manly strength.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

pig

[pig]
(electronics)
An ion source based on the same principle as the Philips ionization gage.
(engineering)
In-line scraper (brush, blade cutter, or swab) forced through pipelines by fluid pressure; used to remove scale, sand, water, and other foreign matter from the interior surfaces of the pipe.
(metallurgy)
A crude metal casting prepared for storage, transportation, or remelting.
(nucleonics)
A heavily shielded container, usually lead, used to ship or store radioisotopes and other radioactive materials.
(vertebrate zoology)
Any wild or domestic mammal of the superfamily Suoidea in the order Artiodactyla; toes terminate in nails which are modified into hooves, the tail is short, and the body is covered sparsely with hair which is frequently bristlelike.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pig

medieval symbol of avarice. [Art: Hall, 247]
See: Greed

pig

attribute of lust personified. [Art: Hall, 247]
See: Lust

pig

mean, sadistic tyrant; epitome of human horridness. [Br. Lit.: Animal Farm]
See: Tyranny
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

pig

1. any artiodactyl mammal of the African and Eurasian family Suidae, esp Sus scrofa (domestic pig), typically having a long head with a movable snout, a thick bristle-covered skin, and, in wild species, long curved tusks
2. 
a. a mass of metal, such as iron, copper, or lead, cast into a simple shape for ease of storing or transportation
b. a mould in which such a mass of metal is formed
3. an automated device propelled through a duct or pipeline to clear impediments or check for faults, leaks, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Pig

(dreams)
Dreaming about this animal in your dream forces you to consider the negative characteristics of yourself or others. There are not many positive characteristics associated with pigs. In some cultures pigs are considered to be very “dirty” and unfit for human consumption. At times, men are referred to as “pigs” for their sexual desires or attitudes. Pigs are also associated with other negative characteristics: greed, stubbornness, and gluttony. Are you (or someone important to you) being “hoggish” with money, time, food, energy, or personal possessions? Superstition-based dream interpretations say that the pig in a dream may suggest a frustrating time in family affairs but success in business. In some cultures the pig is a symbol of prosperity because the families owning one are assured of food for an entire year. As a dream symbol it represents “korist, ” which is loosely translated to mean a valuable possession or event. Animals
Bedside Dream Dictionary by Silvana Amar Copyright © 2007 by Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bad Piggies is available for iPhone and iPad, with each platform offering paid and ad-supported versions.
After the (http://www.rovio.com/en/news/press-releases/217/rovio-to-launch-bad-piggies-on-september-27/) initial reveal of "Bad Piggies" earlier this month, Mikael Hed, Rovio's CEO, said that he hoped the new game would give players an alternative perspective on the pigs from the notorious reputation they've developed as the primary villains of the "Angry Birds" series.
"Bad Piggies gives you the chance to play as the second-most-loved characters in the Angry Birds universe, and explore this rich world through their green eyes."
Artistry and empathizing with farm animals aside, "Bad Piggies" is the first relatively unique or new IP to come from the Finnish developer in three years since "Angry Birds" first transformed mobile gaming and the video game industry at large.
We are giving away six piggy prize packs, to include a Teacup Piggies (pounds 14.99) and a Teacup Piggies Limousine (pounds 24.99).
Write your answer on a postcard or back of a sealed envelope and send, with your name, age, address, phone number and Chipper number to Chipper Teacup Piggies Competition, Consumer Marketing, BPM Media, Floor 6, Fort Dunlop, Fort Parkway, Birmingham B24 9FF.
The Bad Piggies game is also likely to see a new and unique gameplay experience.
"Bad Piggies" has hit both (http://www.facebook.com/badpiggies) Facebook and (https://twitter.com/badpiggies) Twitter , with a (https://twitter.com/BadPiggies/status/242994930325286912) recent tweet stating the game's release will be Sept.
Studio potters (small potteries such as Basil Matthews and David Sharp) have produced great piggies which start from around pounds 30.