pillarization

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pillarization

(translation of Dutch verzuiling) a stable vertical division of society in which patterns of political organization, including trade unions as well as political parties, are determined by religious or linguistic affiliations which substantially

override or cross-cut horizontal class divisions (compare SOCIAL STRATIFICATION). In Holland, where separate Calvinist, Roman Catholic, and secular organizations exist in many spheres of life, this pattern of social organization has become highly institutionalized, the basis of a ‘segmented integration’ and shared political power. Elsewhere, however, e.g. the Lebanon and Northern Ireland, pillarization has often been associated with instability and the failure of power-sharing. See also POLITICAL CLEAVAGE, STABLE DEMOCRACY.

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And was there really this sense of neighborliness in a segregated city, or would indifference caused by pillarisation not be a better model of explaining wartime Sarajevo?
A peculiarity of Dutch society which explains its communist movement's rich cultural life is the fact that the Netherlands is a nation characterised by 'pillarisation', i.e.
They question, too, the assumed fixity of group identities, while worrying that institutionalised group representation precisely fixes them, in the process encouraging social pillarisation and masking intra-group inequalities.
This system of 'pillarisation', the division of society in vertical rather than horizontal organisations, was a typical feature of contemporary Dutch society.
One of the modifications is clay intercalation using organic molecules and then the next step is pillarisation process using metal cationic [9-14].
Pillarisation and intercalation process of the clay was carried out by mixing bentonite, pillaring agent solution and intercalating agent (hexadecyltrimethylammonium-bromide; HDTMA-Br) with ratio [gram bentonite/ volume of solution] = 1 gram/50 mL.
* On the other hand, there is the danger of "pillarisation" of uniformed police, traffic police and criminal investigation, in which the individual management groups no longer work together adequately in the urban areas concerned, cutting themselves off from each other, and even work against each other by failing to coordinate strategies.
The key organising principle of the country is a system of 'pillarisation', conjuring up the image of columns which together hold up a common roof but do not come into direct contact with each other.
The pillarisation of Dutch society into four main groups (socialists, liberals, Catholics, and Protestants) significantly shaped early pension policy.
The process of pillarisation started in the 1880s, when Roman Catholics and Calvinists feared that the Dutch liberal state would impede on their religious practices.
Yet, reflecting the contrary logic of 'pillarisation,' the two major areas of intergovernmental cooperation, the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) and Justice and Home Affairs (JHA), are clearly set apart from the sphere of EC competence per se.
In Dutch parlance the discrete blocs as such are imagined as pillars (zuilen), while the forming and maintenance of primary allegiance to such a bloc within the nation has been called verzuiling (translated in some recent English sources as 'pillarisation').