Pine Beetle

Pine Beetle

 

(Ips sexdentatus), the largest beetle of the family Scolytidae found in the USSR. The cylindrical body reaches 8 mm in length and is covered with long brownish yellow hairs. The apices of the elytra have six denticles each. The coloration is brown. The pine beetle, which is distributed in Europe and North Asia, infests the common pine, Siberian stone pine, spruce, fir, and larch. It usually inhabits the thick trunks of dead but not yet desiccated trees; it also infests and causes the death of weakened living trees. There is one generation each year. Control measures include notching and stripping the bark from affected trees before the beetles emerge and setting out trap trees whose bark has been removed during pupation of the insect larvae.

References in periodicals archive ?
The mountain pine beetle threatens over five million hectares of Albertas pine forest and affects the activities of more than half of the major forest companies operating in the province.
Companies such as Interfor, West Fraser and Conifex have struggled for years with the mountain pine beetle, which has destroyed millions of acres of timber in the western provinces of Canada and Rocky Mountain states of the United States.
Struggling for life in the face of challenges--the pesky mountain pine beetle, a non-native fungal disease called white pine blister rust, and the always ominous force of climate change --the species could certainly use someone advocating for its restoration.
com)-- To monitor forest health issues, such as the southern pine beetle, the Mississippi Forestry Commission (MFC) completes aerial monitoring flights statewide each year in the spring and fall.
Pine Beetle devastating forests:  The Pine Beetle has shifted its range further north with increasingly warm climates in North America, moving into Canada and devastating extremely large areas of pine forest.
7 million acres of whitebark pine--about 11 million pines in all--have been killed by the mountain pine beetle, a native insect that became much more prevalent in Western forests in the late 1990s.
On a rainy afternoon, Molly Hassett, DEC's Southern Pine Beetle Program Planner, and I arrived at Connetquot River State Park Preserve on Long Island to assess tree damage reported by staff.
In the northeastern United States, millions of pine and ash trees are in danger because of two small insects, the southern pine beetle and the emerald ash borer.
The article by Maddie Oatman calls the pine beetle a "super bug.
The concern is that the wide area of mortality that has occurred with the pine beetle outbreak will be magnified by the switch of nutcrackers to other food sources.
And in the last decade, scientists spotted the southern pine beetle north of the Mason-Dixon Line for the first time on record, in New Jersey and later on Long Island.
Global warming, however, has allowed the mountain pine beetle to expand its range into high-elevation forests, where the whitebark pine is virtually defenseless against this newcomer and its explosive attacks.