Pinega

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Pinega

 

an urban-type settlement in Pinega Raion, Arkhangel’sk Oblast, RSFSR. Landing on the right bank of the Pinega River, 230 km east of Arkhangel’sk. Pinega has a logging and timber distribution establishment, a creamery, and a sovkhoz that raises livestock for meat and dairy products.


Pinega

 

a river in Arkhangel’sk Oblast, RSFSR. A right tributary of the Severnaia Dvina River, the Pinega is 779 km long and drains an area of 42,600 sq km.

The Pinega flows primarily across a wide floodplain. In the lower course it flows close to the Kuloi River, with which it is connected by the Kuloi Canal; the Kuloi then empties into Mezen’ Bay of the White Sea. The Pinega is fed primarily by snow and secondarily by rain. Its mean flow rate is approximately 430 cu m per sec. The Pinega freezes in the second half of October or early November, and the ice breaks up in the second half of April or first half of May. The main tributaries are, on the left, the Vyia, lula, and Pokshenga and, on the right, the Ilesha and Ezhuga. The river is navigable from Gorka landing (approximately 580 km from the river’s mouth).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(51) The Arkhangel'sk district court had to endure what were at times impressive distances (Table 4), but according to the data for 1901, for example, justices undertook such trips only rarely (plus Kholmogory, Pinega, and Mezen' could be covered in a single trip) and with a comparatively high degree of comfort (nine out of ten sessions took place from late autumn to early spring, meaning that justices could travel by the more congenial horse-drawn sled).
forces in Pinega sent by 339th Infantry Regiment headquarters in Archangel, it received a telegram back asking, "Just where is the Pinega front?" What had started as an expedition to rescue military supplies and stabilize a portion of Russia had changed focus to staying alive through the winter.
(112) After 1456, the grand princes acquired Vologda and regions around the Pinega, Mezen', Dvina, and Vaga rivers.