Pine Grosbeak

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Pine Grosbeak

 

(Pinícola enucleator), also pine bullfinch, a bird of the family Fringillidae of the order Passeriformes. The body length is about 22 cm, and the weight, about 50 g. The head and breast of the males are raspberry pink, and the back is brownish gray; the breast of the females is olive green. The pine grosbeak is distributed in the taiga zone of Europe, Asia, and North America. A sedentary bird, it will migrate long distances when there is no food. It nests in trees. The clutch contains three to five eggs. The diet includes seeds, buds, berries, and, sometimes, insects. The pine grosbeak is often kept in cages.

References in periodicals archive ?
We obtained the genomic data of 5 species (i.e., Ganoderma sp., Lentinus tigrinus, Bjerkandera adusta, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and Antrodia sinuosa) from the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) and those for 18 other species (i.e., Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, Fibroporia radiculosa, Fomitopsis pinicola, Wolfiporia cocos, Postia placenta, Phanerochaete carnosa, Trametes versicolor, Dichomitus squalens, Trametes cinnabarina, Cryptococcus neoformans, Ustilago maydis, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizophyllum commune, Pleurotus ostreatus, Agaricus bisporus, Auricularia delicate, and Tremella mesenterica) from NCBI.
A: Aythya collaris, B: Podiceps nigricollis, C: Botaurus lentiginosus, D: Clidonias niger, E: Ridgwayia pinicola (Fotos A-D: A.
leuceoptera Gmelin, N R white-winged crossbill Pinicola enucleator (Linnaeus), N R pine grosbeak Family Passeridae (weaver finches) Passer domesticus (Linnaeus), I A Passer domesticus (Linnaeus), I A house sparrow P.
Jacquelin-Duval (1857) also cited that Cis hirtellus Jacquelin-Duval was collected in "boletus ungulatus", which possibly corresponds to Fomitopsis pinicola (Sw.) P.
Pheromones affecting flying beetles colonizing the polypores Fomes fomentarius and Fomitopsis pinicola. Entomol.
pinicola were found on a single dam) and spread of individual thalli to adjacent logs was very rare.
The size of individual thalli of the most abundant species (Fomitopsis pinicola (Sw.:Fr.) P.
The most frequent species were Fomitopsis pinicola (Sw.: Fr.) P.
VC-groups were small and mostly limited to the corresponding sample location as indicated by vegetative compatibility tests among pure cultures of Fomitopsis pinicola (163 vc-groups), Antrodia serialis (125), Gloeophyllum sepiarium (115), and Armillaria cepistipes (16).
Among the decay fungi, Antrodia serialis was the most effective wood decomposer, followed by Fomitopsis pinicola, Gloeophyllum odoratum, G.
This behavior was most distinctive in interactions of Antrodia serialis with Gloeophyllum odoratum and Fomitopsis pinicola, followed by the interactions of F.
pinicola. Gloeophyllure sepiarium produced more decay at the lateral abutments compared to the wing sections.