pink noise


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pink noise

[′piŋk ‚nōiz]
(acoustics)
Noise whose intensity is inversely proportional to frequency over a specified range, to give constant energy per octave.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pink noise

A random signal of every frequency in the audio spectrum, in which each higher octave drops off 3 dB. The lower octaves have more power, and the higher octaves have less power. Pink noise is generated to test loudspeakers in a room as well as to "tune" a room for best audio reproduction.

Also known as "1/f noise," pink noise patterns have been found in music melodies, semiconductors and atomic clocks. They are also found in nature, including the sounds of wind and waterfalls. Contrast with white noise and Gaussian noise.
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References in periodicals archive ?
+1 into an aesthetic experiment in pink noise _ a frequency of sound that has a unique relationship to human biorhythms and the ability to mask background noise," organizers said.
For pink noise, MSE increases with the increase of the TS length, and for long TS (1000 samples), MSE does not depend on [tau].
Acoustical Performance of the Composite Earmuffs in Pink Noise. The IL curve of each earmuff was first determined in pink noise.
Next time you're having trouble drifting off, try filling your room with the sounds of waves lapping on the beach or leaves rustling in the trees - these are nature's pink noise creators (there are lots of apps where
The location of a hidden auditory target was sonified using a combination of white and pink noise in varying proportions (both noises could be perceived simultaneously), so that at 0 degrees to the front the listener hears only white noise and at 180 degrees to the back the listener hears only pink noise.
Each speech segment was mixed with white and pink noise with various levels of signal-to-noise ratio: 0 dB, -3 dB, -6 dB, -9 dB, and -12 dB.
Let us show an example of a modulated signal as below, where x(t) is pink noise.
A loudspeaker array was used to generate pink noise and was positioned in a source room.
In this section the classification system will be examined against noise robustness, in order to do that three versions of the test files is created by mining the file with three noise samples, these noise samples includes brown noise, pink noise, and white noise.
Multi-talker babble noise at 92 dB SPL (sound pressure level) was used to simulate a loud, crowded cocktail party, and pink noise at 83 dB SPL an environment with the maximum noise level allowed for continuous working.
But they are mute and stupid (that dumb), and so their mix of rumble and pink noise is probably only the slow, dying echo of what they fail to be privy to but nevertheless convey--the recurring explosions from which they were flung to drift, alphas, betas, never omegas.
Hence, the use of correlated noise called 'pink noise' is common during the testing and simulation of system dynamics models.