Pinnacles National Monument


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Pinnacles National Monument

Address:5000 Hwy 146
Paicines, CA 95043

Phone:831-389-4485
Web: www.nps.gov/pinn/
Size: 24,514 acres.
Established: Proclaimed on January 16, 1908. Wilderness designated on October 20, 1976.
Location:In the Gabilan Mountains, east of central California's Salinas Valley. Monument consists of two districts. The West District is accessible from US 101 near the town of Soledad, then east along CA 146 to the Chaparral area. The East District entrance is reached via US 25, south of the city of Hollister, then west on CA 146. The two districts are connected by trails, not by a vehicle road.
Facilities:Campground (private), picnic area, rest rooms (é), visitor center (é), museum/exhibit, self-guided tour/trail. Entrance fee required.
Activities:Camping, hiking, rock climbing, wildlife viewing, interpretive programs.
Special Features:Spirelike rock formations 500 to 1,200 feet high, with caves and a variety of volcanic features, rise above the smooth contours of the surrounding countryside. The monument is renowned for the beauty and variety of its spring wildflowers and is also a release site for the endangered California condor, which can sometimes be seen from its hiking trails.

See other parks in California.
Parks Directory of the United States, 5th Edition. © 2007 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Young birds and rehabilitated adult birds were released at Pinnacles National Monument and other sites as early as 1992.
Mile 42.7: Turn right into Pinnacles National Monument, then stop 3 miles in at the Peaks View parking area for a short walk.
Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and Pinnacles National Monument to facilitate the condors' recovery.
There's a new reason to visit Pinnacles National Monument: Bear Gulch Cave, a tunnel-like jumble of boulders formed by thousands of years of water erosion, reopened to visitors last year.
In addition, big-eared bats have moved into talus caves at Pinnacles National Monument in California.
From Dry Wall, an eroded cliff in the new eastern addition to Pinnacles National Monument, resource management chief Larry Whalon can spot rocky Hawkins Peak rising among the park's otherworldly volcanic spires.
In January, President Clinton launched this effort by designating lands adjacent to Grand Canyon National Park and Pinnacles National Monument. He also declared national monuments along the coast of California and a 71,000-acre area 40 miles north of Phoenix, Arizona.
The president also added nearly 8,000 acres to Pinnacles National Monument.
Pinnacles National Monument A freak of the San Andreas Fault, the eerie jumble of rocks and spires that forms Pinnacles National Monument was created by volcanic activity some 23 million years ago.
At Pinnacles National Monument, 80 miles south of San Jose, eroded volcanic spires present an imposing challenge to any hiker.