Pinter

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Pinter

Harold. born 1930, English dramatist. His plays, such as The Caretaker (1959), The Homecoming (1964), No Man's Land (1974), Moonlight (1993), and Celebration (2000), are noted for their equivocal and halting dialogue
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Space and spatial boundaries are intrinsically dangerous in the Pinteresque world; when boundaries shift and are reconfigured, menace, in the form of the famous Pinter "intruder," threatens to disrupt the lives of the characters.
Lott's critics engaged in Pinteresque silence of their own when they omitted a key line of his Bob Jones brief: "Schools are allowed to practice racial discrimination in admissions in the interest of diversity." For backers of affirmative action, that statement remains uncomfortably accurate.
Beckettian or Pinteresque in its sparring, circular futility, it begs for Off-Off Broadway production and would provoke hysterical laughter with the right audience.
182-187) or working with playscripts, preferably the short Pinteresque kind (pp.311-318).
Employing Pinteresque pauses and powerful expressions, frequently conveyed via her large dark blue eyes, Rizq mesmerised the audience, delivering the chilling message of the play to their hearts as effectively in her 90s as she had three decades earlier.
One of the ways Egoyan chose to do this was through dialogue, exchanging his familiar Pinteresque silences for a more loquacious approach.
His twenty-nine plays, which include The Birthday Party, The Caretaker, The Homecoming, Betrayal, Party Time, and One for the Road, have inspired the adjective "Pinteresque," which the Financial Times defined as "full of dark hints and pregnant suggestions, with the audience left uncertain as to what to conclude."
Zozaya Aritzia, Pilar."A visit to three new/old pinteresque 'other places'".
A German translator of The Birthday Party understandably unversed in the mysteries of the game of cricket, assumed that Goldberg's savage accusation 'Who watered the wicket in Melbourne?' had something to do with urination and a gate as he produced 'Wer hat an das Pfortchen von Melbourne gepinkelt?' - again, more perhaps surrealistically Pinteresque than the original.
Pinter's influence is also evident throughout the British and American theater, and in film as well: the "Pinteresque" moment of portentous non sequitur has become a stylistic cliche, as visible in David Mamet or Sam Shepard as it is in Pinter's recent work.
The Homecoming, for all its Pinteresque set pieces of inconsequential small talk, has a plot that is as unlikely as it is morbidly fascinating, while the events in Beggars generally have to be construed as symbolic and happening in a dream world where a character's id regularly slips in asides that betray his or her true, nasty nature, while the poets on delivers soliloquies meant to bridge the gap between the real world and theatrical ritual.
This is not the only aspect of Bonds that strikes one as Pinteresque: Poole uses terse, spare dialogue, pregnant pauses and droll, seemingly inconsequential observations to great effect; she has a fine knack of loading undercurrents but leaving them submerged; most striking of all is the touch of menace she conjures up in Alice's and Pat's manipulation of their kindly visitor--forcing tea and cake and cuttings from the garden on her, extorting a snapshot of her two children from her and finally, having made her stay much longer than she meant to, causing her to worry about her child-rearing habits.