Pinyin


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Pinyin

(pĭn`yĭn`) [Chin. Hanyu pinyin = Chinese phonetic alphabet], system of romanization of Chinese written characters, approved in 1958 by the government of the People's Republic of China and officially adopted by it in 1979. Developed in the 1950s by a committee headed by Zhou Youguang, it was based on several earlier romanization systems, and replaced that those and the more complex Wade-Giles system (1859; modified 1912), among others. The reasons for adopting Pinyin included promoting a national language, establishing a means for writing non-Chinese (minority) languages in China, and encouraging foreigners to learn Chinese. Pinyin, which became more widely used in the West in the 1980s, was adopted officially in Taiwan in 2009 but is not used exclusively there.
References in periodicals archive ?
Much of his inspiration comes from pinyin, the official Romanised system of standard Chinese, which he learned when attending a postgraduate program at Zhejiang University.
The first student went for the conventional pinyin method and encountered some spelling difficulty, the second student wrote it with her finger.
The adoption of Zhuyin, rather than the more frequently adopted Pinyin, which uses the familiar western alphabet to represent the sounds of Chinese), was explored, with the study centred on exploring reasons for use of one system over another.
The change in the transcription of the Chinese characters from the French system into pinyin is first of all due to the English language of the new edition, but it is also highly appreciated because of its adoption as an international standard.
pinyin used in the book; it is not meant to be read, and indeed there
Flexible search: search words in Chinese, Pinyin and English, CC-CEDICT based dictionary.
Then, with the character-to-pinyin function on Microsoft Office Word 2011, we transformed all Chinese characters into pinyin. Finally, the sentence splitter from the adjusted ICTCLAS system [26] was used to segment the text into sentences.
That's actually how the dinosaur gets its name: Tongtianlong limosus is a mix of Chinese Pinyin and Latin meaning "muddy dragon on the road to heaven."
At the beginning of each lesson all members of the club partake in reading the pinyin board and saying the vowels.
To this end, it has been written with the absolute minimum of "sinological" apparatus; texts and titles of offices are all translated into English, with no transcription into pinyin provided.
There is also a convenient pronunciation index for Chinese words written in Pinyin. Perhaps more exciting is Auyang's willingness to incorporate non-traditional methods (at least for the historical profession) to illuminate political and economic structures, including the use of fractals.