Pinyin

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Related to Pinyin Romanization: Pin-yin

Pinyin

(pĭn`yĭn`) [Chin. Hanyu pinyin = Chinese phonetic alphabet], system of romanization of Chinese written characters, approved in 1958 by the government of the People's Republic of China and officially adopted by it in 1979. Developed in the 1950s by a committee headed by Zhou Youguang, it was based on several earlier romanization systems, and replaced that those and the more complex Wade-Giles system (1859; modified 1912), among others. The reasons for adopting Pinyin included promoting a national language, establishing a means for writing non-Chinese (minority) languages in China, and encouraging foreigners to learn Chinese. Pinyin, which became more widely used in the West in the 1980s, is not used officially in Taiwan.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Pinyin romanization, the two-character name is written as one name, as in Lin Yutang's name.
Contemporary readers, familiar with the now-standard mainland Chinese hanyu pinyin romanization "Beijing", may find the older style "Peking" incongruously replete with Western associations and bias.
Qing follows the pinyin romanization which is the system considered authoritative in the People's Republic of China since 1949.
This reviewer detected only two misprints in this good-size volume: on page 31, the year of Sun's admission to the Medical School of Canton Hospital should be 1886 rather than 1866; and on page 235, the pinyin romanization for Big-gun-Sun should be Sun dapao rather than Sun dabao.