piriformis


Also found in: Medical.

piriformis

[‚pir·ə′fȯr·məs]
(anatomy)
A muscle arising from the front of the sacrum and inserted into the greater trochanter of the femur.
References in periodicals archive ?
MRI has the ability to access different degrees of inflammation and edema and to prove a possible spread to muscles (iliac or piriformis muscles) (6).
This opens up the hips and stretches the piriformis muscle to reduce pressure on the sciatic nerve.
Atrophy of the piriformis secondary to hip pathology or neuromuscular diseases likely contributes to this etiology of ureterosciatic hernia.
Visual Analog Scale results Muscle pain Ligament pain Initials Piriformis Quadratus Paravertebral Sacroiliac lumborum muscles ligament I.T.
Massage the lower back, gluteals, especially piriformis and the posterior surface of the legs.
This passes between the sacral nerves, usually S1 and S2, sometimes S2 and S3 and leaves the pelvis through the greater sciatic foramen below the piriformis muscle (Figure 5).
The hip flexor [3] and piriformis [4] stretches help relax the lower back muscles that tighten from hours of sitting down.
A The sciatic nerve is a collection of nerve fibers at the base of the spine that come together and form the sciatic nerve, which runs below the piriformis muscle in the buttock and down the back of the thigh.
* Piriformis syndrome The piriformis muscle is a deep muscle situated in the buttock area: it connects the femur (thighbone) to the spine, and enables you to rotate your leg outwards.
"Common areas of the body are the calves, to remove soreness from long runs, and even loosen calf muscles to alleviate pain from plantar fasciitis; the hamstrings for similar reasons; the buttocks to relieve piriformis syndrome; and the back to help sciatic pain, or to just relieve tension," Taylor said.
In regard to anterograde IMN, both piriformis and trochanteric entry designs have pros and cons.
Level I refers to the intermingling fibres of the cardinal/uterosacral ligament complex which attaches the upper vagina, cervix, and lower uterine segment to the obturator muscle/sacrum, piriformis, and coccygeus, respectively (Figure 2).