Pit dwelling

Pit dwelling

An excavated residence that is either partially or wholly below grade; found in the southwest United States and northern Mexico.
References in periodicals archive ?
19) For example, in Kojiki (Ancient Matters, 712) on his eastward expedition to claim his heavenly authority, Emperor Jimmu and his men smite a great number of resisting indigenous pit dwelling tribe-men described as tsuchigumo (Kurano and Takeda 1958, 157).
Now a tourist attraction, the Hotel Sidi Driss in Matamata, Tunisia, is built out of five pit dwellings, and has been likened to an earthy silent tomb.
And far from being futuristic, the form is actually inspired by traditional Japanese pit dwellings, which are partly excavated into the ground.
Also found were the remains of two pit dwellings believed to be a bit later in date than the two buildings, the officials said.
Excavations of three 850-year-old pit dwellings strewn with butchered human skeletons have yielded evidence of cannibalism in the prehistoric U.
Visitors can also see Fremont granaries built high on ledges, as well as several pit dwellings that are invisible to the untrained eye, but known to experts such as Evans.
450 to 1300 in what is now the southwestern United States, were a mobile people who occupied distinctive pit dwellings for a few as 10 or 15 years before moving on.