Pithos


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Pithos

 

a large clay vessel used during the Minoan-Myce-naean period for storing grain and similar products. Pithoi were ovate and measured 1.5 to 2 m high. Aegean pithoi were adorned with frieze-like relief, whereas Greek pithoi were plain. The vessels usually were buried in the ground and topped with a stone or clay cover.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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On ne peut omettre d'indiquer la fameuse copie romaine de la tete de Meduse ornant l'egide de la statue d'Athena du Parthenon, oeuvre originale de Phidias, (40) ni la Meduse Rondanini, copie d'apres Phidias, ou encore Persee avec un chapeau, des bottes ailees et la kibisis jetee sur l'epaule, qui detourne la tete pour tuer Meduse, dans un pithos orientalisant a reliefs, v.
(1) According to Greek mythology, Pandora, acting out of sheer curiosity and not out of malice, opened a jar (a "pithos"), releasing all the evils of mankind and leaving only Hope inside once she had closed it again.
Mendoza also sources the frappato varietal and truly Old World wines such as Pithos, a blend of nero d'avola and frappato that is fermented in a clay amphora from Azienda Agricola COS.
(9) See also du Bois 1988 on the linguistic and imagistic similarities of pithos and gaster and womb.
On a large funerary pithos dated to around 675 BCE from the island of Mykonos, one of the very earliest surviving representations of the fall of Troy in art, a series of panels shows the Trojan women taken captive and their children slain before their eyes.
Pottery, for example, is divided into seven subclasses: coarse ware, medium coarse ware, fine ware, semifine ware, kitchen/cooking ware, lamp, and pithos. These subdivisions are further divided, potentially ad infinitum.
Dionysus is certainly able to confer special favors on select individuals (e.g., associating Pithos with wine vats: 20.129-36), but such specific rewards are an unnecessary instrument in view of what else he can offer followers, who, apart from male warriors and Bacchants, include satyrs, silenoi, Pans, nature spirits, centaurs, and animals.
Instead there is her `bitchy temperament', and she is armed with sexual attraction and deceitful eloquence, to enable her to ingratiate herself with men even when her misdeeds are discovered.(18) Most famously of all, Pandora either came with, or found in the house of Epimetheus, a pithos, and by removing its lid she released into the world a great store of ills previously kept under control inside it.
What's alarming is that he harps on about the negativity of the womb as the site of death and destruction: "Pandora herself...is the pithos [jar], from which dismal, prolific mankind issues forth and to which men return, either to bury their desires for a moment or to be buried forever." He makes no counter-argument to the woman-hating interpretations of Pandora that have existed since Hesiod.
Whether MChal communities fissioned and dispersed because of conflicts over incipient concentrations of social power or serious demographic challenges remains unknown, but the evidence from the even fewer excavated LChal settlements and mortuary complexes suggests that the tensions of unequal resource concentration, e.g., the "Pithos House" and the mortuary enclosure at Kissonerga Mosphilia, continued to play out subsequently, despite what Knapp calls "deep-seated alterations in Late Chalcolithic society" (p.