Pityriasis Versicolor


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Related to Pityriasis Versicolor: pityriasis alba
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Pityriasis Versicolor

 

(also called tinea versicolor), a fungal disease of the skin that proceeds without affecting the hair or nails. Pityriasis versicolor is classified as a dermatomycosis. The causative agent is the pathogenic mycelial fungus Microspo-ron furfur. The disease is localized predominantly on the skin of the chest, back, neck, and shoulders. It is characterized by the appearance of sharply delineated, gradually enlarging, irregularly shaped desquamatory scales that are yellow-pink, light brown, or dark brown in color. As a rule, no internal sensations arise. Without proper treatment, the disease, which is only slightly infectious, may persist for decades. Depigmented spots mark the sites of previous rashes, especially after exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Pityriasis versicolor is treated with desquamatory agents and can be prevented with conscientious care of the skin and control of perspiration.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Pityriasis versicolor (PV) is a chronic, superficial cutaneous fungal infection caused by fungus Malassezia (M).
Identification of Malassezia Species isolated from Patients with Pityriasis Versicolor in Sari, Iran, 2012.
Pityriasis versicolor: a clinicomycological and epidemiological study from a tertiary care hospital.
In addition to the moist slide of Potassium Hydroxide, a scotch tape (transparent cellophane tape) slide was collected as well from the patients suspected to Pityriasis Versicolor. Next, the prepared slides were scrutinized under light microscopic lenses 10 and 40.
Pityriasis versicolor (tinea versicolor) is a common mild infection of the skin which is caused by the lipophilic yeast Malassezia furfur.1 Colonization of the skin by this organism more frequently occurs in areas with high sebaceous activity and the disease is more common during adolescence and young adulthood.2 This condition is common in tropics and sex distribution is equal.3 Clinically the disease is characterized by scaly hyperpigmented and hypopigmented lesions which can occur simultaneously in any patient.4
Pityriasis versicolor, a nondermatophytosis was seen with a prevalence of 4.4%.
Sei, and T Sugita, "Molecular analysis of Malassezia microflora from patients with pityriasis versicolor," Mycopathologia, vol.
(4) Regarding leprosy, participants were trained to suspect it when noting a 'pale patch' by sensory testing and to eliminate other diseases presenting with similar signs such as pityriasis alba, pityriasis versicolor, birth marks (naevus anaemicus) and vitiligo.
Tinea versicolor, sometimes called pityriasis versicolor, is just what it name means: yeast (tinea) or scaling (pityriasis) with many colors (versicolor).
THE most likely cause is pityriasis versicolor, an uncommon rash that usually develops after sun exposure.