Pius IV


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Pius IV,

1499–1565, pope (1559–65), a Milanese named Giovanni Angelo de' Medici; successor of Paul IV. He was probably not related to the great Medici family. His career in Rome began in 1527, and he held increasingly important offices under Clement VII, Paul III (who made him a cardinal), and Julius III. Cardinal Medici was one of the reform party, but he was no rigorist, hence he was out of favor with Paul IV. The great feature of his pontificate was the reconvening of the Council of Trent (see Trent, Council ofTrent, Council of,
1545–47, 1551–52, 1562–63, 19th ecumenical council of the Roman Catholic Church, convoked to meet the crisis of the Protestant Reformation.
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) for its last and most important session (1562–63). By quietly easing the difficulties of the council and publicly backing it, Pius gained new respect for the papacy and made himself one of the great popes of the Counter ReformationCounter Reformation,
16th-century reformation that arose largely in answer to the Protestant Reformation; sometimes called the Catholic Reformation. Although the Roman Catholic reformers shared the Protestants' revulsion at the corrupt conditions in the church, there was present
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. He welcomed the final break with Protestantism, which the council brought about. His good political relations with Spain were in contrast with Paul IV's anti-Hapsburg policy. Pius's chief aid was his nephew, St. Charles BorromeoCharles Borromeo, Saint
, 1538–84, Italian churchman, b. near Lago Maggiore. His uncle, Pius IV, summoned Charles, a student at Pavia, to Rome in 1560. In rapid order he was made cardinal-deacon, administrator of the Papal States and of the archdiocese of Milan, and papal
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. He was succeeded by St. Pius V.
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Pius IV

original name Giovanni Angelo de' Medici. 1499--1565, pope (1559--65). He reconvened the Council of Trent (1562), confirming its final decrees
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Pius IV had a large trench built around part of Castel Sant'Angelo that can still be seen today, its walls displaying inscriptions that credit Pius IV (fig.
Ligorio and Vasari, who took Ligorio's post at the Vatican on the death of Pius IV, were bitter rivals and ideological enemies, with Vasari accusing Ligorio of belittling his hero Michelangelo.
There is some vitriol and crudeness, as when Jesus and the Apostles Peter and Paul encounter Pope Pius IV, who after stating that papal supremacy is upheld by all Catholici, Jesus names them Caco-lyci.
Peter's but were then moved elsewhere, among them: Eugene IV, Callistus III, Pius II, Alexander VI, Leo X, Hadrian VI, Pius IV, Pius V, Clement VIII, Paul V, Gregory XV, Innocent X, Clement IX, Benedict XIII, and Clement XIV.
Mullett discusses briefly the post-Tridentine popes from Pius IV (1561-66) through Clement VIII (1592-1605), with emphasis on the importance of Pius V (1566-72).
De Bujanda furthermore discusses the "Moderatio indicis," the result of a revision of the index under Paul's successor, Pius IV. The texts of both the "Instructio" and the "Moderatio" are given in full.
European endorsement of Cosimo as Duke of Florence and Siena by the Treaty of Cambrai, and the election of his protege Pius IV in 1559, emboldened his bid for kingship, to which end, Veen contends, Cosimo abjured autocratic referencing.
The papacies of Paul IV (1555-59), Pius IV (1559-65), Pius V (1566-72), and Gregory XIII (1572-85) were marked by indecision, dissent, and defensiveness.
His standing then as ambassador of the duke of Savoy neatly highlights how much Carnesecchi's fate depended on political circumstances, principally Cosimo I's refusal finally to intercede for his subject once it was clear how determined Pius V was to make an end of Carnesecchi, twice absolved by that pope's predecessors Paul III and Pius IV. For aficionados of diplomatic history, it is worth emphasizing more than the editors do that the typically large Florentine diplomatic establishment in Rome did not all sing quite the same tune and some of its members appear to have gone beyond Cosimo's wishes in their zeal to see Carnesecchi condemned.
Therefore, most of the discussion centers on the second trial which began under Paul IV and was concluded under his successor Pius IV. The story has been known in outline, even if few of the documents have been (Manzoni's publication concerned Garnesecchi's final trial).
This time Orsini was going to Caprarola, but was unsure whether to bring Giovanni Antonio, a man identified as one who had painted the Cosmography at the Vatican in the time of Pius IV. Orsini thought it would be good to have this Giovanni Antonio [Vanosino da Varese] apportion the paintings, and it would seem from the use of the word "vani" that this was probably an apportioning that had to do with the walls, where windows, doors, and other such openings would be found.
Peter Blastenbrei's "second dissertation" (Habilitationsschrift) on criminality in Rome during the pontificates of Pius IV, Pius V, and Gregory XIII is as thorough as his other work but somehow less pleasing to read.