Pius IX


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Pius IX,

1792–1878, pope (1846–78), an Italian named Giovanni M. Mastai-Ferretti, b. Senigallia; successor of Gregory XVIGregory XVI,
1765–1846, pope (1831–46), an Italian named Bartolomeo Alberto Capellari, b. Belluno; successor of Pius VIII. In 1783 he became a Camaldolite and was (1825) created cardinal.
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. He was cardinal and bishop of Imola when elected pope. For two years he pursued a progressive policy in governing the Papal StatesPapal States,
Ital. Lo Stato della Chiesa, from 754 to 1870 an independent territory under the temporal rule of the popes, also called the States of the Church and the Pontifical States. The territory varied in size at different times; in 1859 it included c.
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 and granted a constitution. However, in 1848 rioting drove him from Rome to Gaeta, and he returned (1850) to be supported in power only by the forces of Napoleon III. The Italian nationalists were eager for Rome and the Papal States, and in 1860 Victor Emmanuel II seized all but Rome and its neighborhood. In 1870, on the deposition of Napoleon III, the Italians entered Rome, and Pius retired to the Vatican, refusing to recognize the new kingdom and to accept the proffered indemnity. The anomalous situation, called the Roman Question, was settled eventually by the Lateran TreatyLateran Treaty,
concordat between the Holy See and the kingdom of Italy signed in 1929 in the Lateran Palace, Rome, by Cardinal Gasparri for Pius XI and by Benito Mussolini for Victor Emmanuel III. One of the important negotiators was Cardinal Pacelli, later Pope Pius XII.
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. Pius's dealings with other nations were unfortunate, and he did not conduct his side of the KulturkampfKulturkampf
[Ger.,=conflict of cultures], the conflict between the German government under Bismarck and the Roman Catholic Church. The promulgation (1870) of the dogma of the infallibility of the pope in matters of faith and morals within the church sparked the conflict; it
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 with the finesse of his successor. In 1854, Pius declared the dogma of the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin to be an article of faith. In 1864 he issued the encyclical Quanta cura, accompanied by a list (Syllabus) of erroneous modernistic statements. In 1869 he convoked the First Vatican CouncilVatican Council, First,
1869–70, the 20th ecumenical council of the Roman Catholic Church (see council, ecumenical), renowned chiefly for its enunciation of the doctrine of papal infallibility.
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, the principal work of which was the enunciation of papal infallibility. Pius IX's pontificate—the longest in history—helped define the role of Roman Catholicism in the modern world. He was succeeded by Leo XIIILeo XIII,
1810–1903, pope (1878–1903), an Italian (b. Carpineto, E of Rome) named Gioacchino Pecci; successor of Pius IX. Ordained in 1837, he earned an excellent reputation as archbishop of Perugia (1846–77), and was created cardinal in 1853.
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. Pius IX was beatified in 2000 by John Paul II.

Pius IX

original name Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti. 1792--1878, Italian ecclesiastic; pope (1846--78). He refused to recognize the incorporation of Rome and the Papal States in the kingdom of Italy, confining himself to the Vatican after 1870. He decreed the dogma of the Immaculate Conception (1854) and convened the Vatican Council, which laid down the doctrine of papal infallibility (1870)
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The decree which was approved by Pope Pius IX on February 7, 1847, read: 'With enthusiastic acclaim and with unanimous approval and consent, the Fathers [of the Baltimore Council] have chosen the Blessed Virgin Mary, conceived without sin, as the Patroness of the United States of America.'
11, 1865, when now Blessed Pius IX entrusted the icon to the Redemptorists with the instruction that they spread her devotion around the world.
Pius IX, for example, was a truly likeable man, devout, humble, and uncomplicated; yet, by the end of his pontificate, the papacy wielded more authority than ever before.
He was also declared to be the patron saint and protector of the Catholic Church by Pope Pius IX in 1870, and is the patron of several countries and regions.
The church was officially recognized in 1860 by Pope Pius IX.
That's the way Pope Pius IX used it in 1864 when he titled his compilation of 80 propositions (which he condemned as heretical) Syllabus of Errors.
Hitler, a Catholic, was also fond of quoting Martin Luther: aNext to the devil you have no enemy more cruel, more venomous and virulent than a true Jew.a He also drew on nineteenth-century anti-Semitic precedents such as the Dreyfus Affair, clerical support for pogroms, and the rebuilding of the Roman Jewish ghetto by Pope Pius IX. In 1938, Pope Pius XII remarked that Jewish alipsa[bar]cursea Jesus and their ahearts reject him even today.a After the war, members of the Catholic Church and the Vatican actively aided the escape of Nazi war criminals, even allowing them sanctuary in churches.
Though this prototype emerged in the late eighteenth century, popes in subsequent centuries, especially Pius IX (1846-1878) and Pius X (1903-1914), perfected the anti-modernist position, making it the institutional face of the Catholicism during their reigns.
But priests in the Birmingham oratory have a similar epistle from Pius IX going back to 1847, accompanying what was said to be Valentine's entire body which is kept in the ora- tory's side altars.
Set against the background of the upheavals of 1848, L'Ebreo di Verona associates secret societies with Jews and describes them as being mainly responsible for the exile of Pope Pius IX. In the characterization of Aser, Lang locates a number of stereotypical denigrations of Jews, including their alleged revolutionary or anarchic spirit, their attachment to money, and so on.
1854: Pope Pius IX proclaimed the Immaculate Conception.
In addition to the eight main essays (including "After Fifty Years: How Can We Talk about Guilt, Suffering, and Reconciliation?", "Reflections on the Shoah", and "Pope Pius IX and the Jews"), Coming Together for the Sake of God also includes a set of responses to the work of the discussion group.