Place de Grève

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Place de Grève

 

old name of the square in front of the Paris city hall, renamed Place de l’Hôtel de Ville in 1806. It became famous by virtue of the fact that for many centuries (until 1830) it was a place of execution. It was there that the creation of a provisional government was declared during the Revolution of 1848. that the republic was proclaimed on Sept. 4, 1870. and that the proclamations of the Paris Commune were made in March 1871.

References in classic literature ?
but he is a scoundrel, that Frenchman," said Mazarin, "and the idea is not so ingenious as to prevent its author being tied up by the neck at the Place de Greve, by decree of the parliament."
Paul or of the Place de Greve; it was at the Traitor's Cross that his journey and his destiny were about to end!
If they are arrested they will only be put in the Bastile; if we are arrested it is a matter of the Place de Greve."
"A bad relapse, that will lead you, if I mistake not, to the Place de Greve. So much the worse, so much the worse -- diavolo, as they say in my country."
What was first erected on the Place de Greve, Paris, in 1792?
Field lays out both the book's fate at the hands of the late thirteenth- and early fourteenth-century religious authorities and Marguerite's persistent refusal to accept negative judgments against it, a refusal that ended with her being given over to secular authorities and put to death by fire at the Place de Greve in Paris on June 1, 1310.
He argues, for example, that Marguerite was likely killed at the Place de Greve because on the same day a "relapsed Jew" was also put to the stake.
They resided in the overcrowded boarding houses of the city's center and gathered each morning looking for work in an open-air hiring market in the Place de Greve, located in front of Paris's town hall (the Hotel de Ville).
In showing the killing of de Flesselles on the steps in front of the Hotel de Ville, Prieur takes the vantage point of the Place de Greve, and it is from the Place de Greve that popular anger issues.
Persons, groups and locations familiar to historians of Paris and the Revolution make an appearance: Lafayette, Bailly (Paris's mayor), the journalists Marat and Gorat, mouchards (the police-spies much hated by the populace), National Guard, the Place Vendome, Place de Greve, Palais-Royal, Hotel de Ville and La Force prison.
[1] Though less well known, a similar relationship existed between the Place de Greve, the open square fronting Paris' Hotel de Ville (cityhall), and the migrant stonemasons from central France who used the setting as a hiring fair.
On 10 October 1783 Jacques Francois Pascal, a defrocked monk who had assaulted an errand boy and stabbed him seventeen times, was broken on the wheel and burned alive in the place de Greve before a large crowd.