Planck's law


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Planck's law

See Planck constant.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Planck's law

[′pläŋks ‚lȯ]
(quantum mechanics)
A fundamental law of quantum theory stating that energy associated with electromagnetic radiation is emitted or absorbed in discrete amounts which are proportional to the frequency of radiation.
(statistical mechanics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Planck's law is often used to define the no-feedback response.
It might also be emitting more energy across the electromagnetic spectrum than Planck's law deems possible.
For a polymer melt the T([[Tau].sub.[Lambda]]) term in Eq 14 is typically small, thus Planck's law can be further simplified as Wien's law, i.e.
[c.sub.1] = Planck's law constant, [[c.sub.1] = 3.742 x [10.sup.8] w [multiplied by] [[[micro]meter].sup.4]/[m.sup.2]].
[c.sub.2] = Planck's law constant, [[c.sub.2] = 1.439 x [10.sup.4] [[micro]meter] [degrees] K].
In 1910, Peter Debye, derives Planck's law by quantizing the vibration modes of the electromagnetic field without recourse to oscillators [5; p.
If Planck's law [1, 2] has not been linked to a physical species, it is in part certain that the formulation of Kirchhoff's law [20-22], in its creation of universality, hindered the process.