Plant Community


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Related to Plant Community: Plant succession

Plant Community

 

a group of autotrophic and heterotrophic plants in a given location that are mutually related to one another and to other components of the biotic and abiotic environment. A plant community is an important part of a more complex system—the biogeocenosis. As a result of the vital processes of autotrophic organisms, chiefly green plants, a plant community stores solar energy and, with the participation of all the components of the biocenosis, transforms the energy and carries out the biological cycle. Plant communities usually consist of many species belonging to different life forms yet possessing mechanisms that enable them to grow together under certain environmental conditions.

References in periodicals archive ?
Based on presented model by Clements, if a plant community in an area with specific edaphic and climatic conditions pass evolution path, this community on track to reach its peak or climax will travel linear path.
Plotting the sites in species space using NMDS provides a visual interpretation of the differences in plant community composition between sites or groups of sites.
To examine changes in overall plant community composition, we used nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS).
As seeding with agronomic species may also have altered the pathway of vegetation succession, we also expected divergent patterns of plant community composition in areas subject to revegetation treatments compared to untreated areas.
Spatial heterogeneity of a plant community could be driven by several factors such as biotic interactions (CALLAWAY & al., 1995; FAJARDO & al., 2008), environmental heterogeneity (EHRENFELD & al., 1997; HUTCHINGS & al., 2003) and patterns of growth or seed dispersal (HERBEN & al., 1995; NATHAN & al., 2000).
[2] introduce fuzzy equivalence relation to measure functional diversity of plant community. Although some applications and comparisons have proved these methods to be useful in functional diversity analysis [2, 8-10], the effective methods for measuring functional diversity are still a limit in practical studies [3, 8].
When coupled with leaf area indices of each plant community, hourly light intensity during the growing season, and light transmission rates through canopy layers, the canopy-level [CO.sub.2] assimilation rate for each plant community is calculated from species-specific light use efficiency curves.
Plant community organization and dynamics was first seen as largely a consequence of plant competition.
The scientists used a computer model that predicts the type of plant community that is uniquely adapted to any climate on Earth to simulate the future state of global vegetation under ten climate scenarios.
We statistically analyzed plant community characteristics against evidence of disturbance using ANOVA and Pearson correlations.
A matrix listing presence-absence data of each species for each plant community was assembled.
After an initial trip to the study site to learn the dominant plants and qualitativelydescribe the area, we discuss--first in small student teams and then as a class--all the possible factors influencing plant community structure at this site.