plantar

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plantar

[′plan·tər]
(anatomy)
Of or relating to the sole of the foot.
References in periodicals archive ?
Williams, a naval historian and stepdaughter of Plante, describes how the art of Scottish artist George Plante (1914-1995) served the World War II alliance between the US and the UK, as agents of the British Ministry of Information and the War Artists Advisory Committee recruited him to use his paintings of the war at sea to secure American support for Britain in the war.
Au total, ce sont 4 milliards d'arbres qui devraient etre plantes d'ici la fin du mois de septembre, soit 40 graines par habitant de ce pays de 108 millions de personnes precise The Guardian.
Innovest Global Inc (OTC Markets:IVST) revealed on Monday that it has appointed Plante Moran as the company's internal accounting partner.
Under terms of the agreement, Plante Moran will take over the annual Working Relations Index study.
Il est constitue d'une plante entiere, d'une partie de plante appelee drogue vegetale ou encore d'un extrait de plante.
bishops are in the crosshairs of scrutiny and scorn over their handling of clerical sexual abuse, psychologist Thomas Plante admits that at times he is viewed as a shill for them when he lays out the facts of the U.S.
"It's just been a very comfortable bar," said Sandy Plante, who bought the place six years ago with her husband, Mark.
Menace & Murder: A Lynda La Plante Collection is a DVD collection three acclaimed mysterythrillers by Lynda La Plante, artfully adapted into short television series.
DIFFICULT WOMEN: A MEMOIR OF THREE BY DAVID PLANTE new york: new york review books.
Cela necessite des etudes detaillees pour identifier le dosage correct qui est sur a utiliser, et donc une grande prudence doit etre appliquee sur l'utilisation arbitraire de la plante medicinale.
NYT Syndicate In the annals of literary treachery, there is a special place reserved for David Plante and his memoir Difficult Women, a portrait of three of his friends (or so they believed): novelist Jean Rhys; feminist writer Germaine Greer; and Sonia Orwell, George's widow, who presided, in her depressive fashion, over London's bookish set in the 1970s.
PRIME SUSPECT author Lynda La Plante has said ITV's prequel of the show caused her "anger and real deep distress".