Platanaceae


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Platanaceae

[‚plat·ən′ās·ē‚ē]
(botany)
A small family of monoecious dicotyledonous plants in which flowers have several carpels which are separate, three or four stamens, and more or less orthotropous ovules, and leaves are stipulate.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2005) proposed that distinctive donut-like trichome base scars that often encompass more than one epidermal cell represented a synapomorphy linking Platanaceae and Proteaceae.
This is unfortunate because fossils of the sister group of Proteaceae, Platanaceae, are widespread in the Northern Hemisphere and date from the Lower Cretaceous (Crane et al., 1993).
Cinar Leaves Calcification (Platanaceae, MARE Leaves Antipyretic 15355) Leaves Toothache Portulaca oleracea L.
Revision of the Mexican and Guatemalan species of Platanus (Platanaceae).
Platanus hispanica Platanaceae Unknown origin Miller ex Munchh.
from the Paleocene of North America, Greenland, and Asia and their relationships among extinct and extant Platanaceae. Int.
Bisexual Platanaceae flowers and inflorescences from the Late Cretaceous of Vancouver Island, Canada.
analyses the most likely sister groups of Saxifragacaeae and Platanaceae
Alveolarity within Gunneraceae is distinctive in this character because prominent or impressed veins include the penultimate vein order present (e.g., the fifth or sixth order), whereas in other taxa that sometimes show alvaeolarity, accentuation of the veins is usually restricted to the third (or fourth) order; e.g., Vitaceae, Platanaceae. The presence of pseudo-colleters (character 39 below) in many species of Gunnera greatly exaggerates their alveolarity.
He asserted that the more specialized types of inflorescence tend to occur in angiospermous trees (even in those of relatively primitive families, such as Platanaceae and Winteraceae), a fact that he attributes to adaptive selection.
By the end of the Cretaceous, woods with combinations of characters present in extant Magnoliales (Magnoliaceae, Eupomatiaceae), Laurales (Chloranthaceae, Monimiaceae s.l., Lauraceae), "winteroids" (Winteraceae, Illiciaceae), and eudicots (Eupteleaceae, Platanaceae, Hamamelidaceae, Tetracentraceae) are known (Page, 1981; Wheeler & Baas, 1991), but the precise relationships of many of these fossils and their evolutionary implications remain unknown.
Platanaceae Clark, Maxwell 1706 Polygonum arenastrum Polygonaceae Harrison, W.E.