Platen Press

platen press

[′plat·ən ‚pres]
(graphic arts)
A type of printing press with a flat surface bearing the inked type; another flat surface, bearing the paper, is pressed against the type; small hand presses are ordinarily of this sort.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Platen Press

 

a printing press in which the printing apparatus consists of two plates. The printing form is attached to one plate (the bed), and the other plate (the platen) presses the sheet of paper to the form. Platen presses form a relatively small group of small-format, single-color, sheet-fed relief presses. They are used for short printing runs.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Fontijne Grotnes Composite Curing Press, supplied through UK agents, Intellicare, is a laboratory platen press designed for the polymer processing, rubber and composites industry.
The Fontijne Grotnes composite curing press (or platen press), the LabPro 1000, is a hydraulically operated two-column press with prism guiding with 500 x 500 mm heated platens, platen heating up to 450[degrees]C and a wide range press force, from 100 to 10,000 kN.
API, in collaboration with Newfoil, is launching the PG grade to platen press stamping label manufacturers in the UK.
Impulse pressing experiments were subsequently conducted with a platen press under realistic operating conditions.
TB: Using a platen press in a printer's shop, I printed the plane module with the two thousand smaller planes on large rubber cloths.
They used two laboratory devices--a platen press and a shoe press--to impulse press fiber webs formed from bleached softwood kraft pulps over a range of basis weights.
The Gietz Nota is an established platen press for currency foiling with up to 6 programmable foil feeds typically outputting 4000 sheets/hour (5000 maximum).
Additives-free samples and sheets with 2% cationic starch or 15% Ca[CO.sub.3] made from pulps beaten at 25[degrees]SR and 40[degrees]SR were prepared and impulse dried at six temperatures (25[degrees]C, 80[degrees]C, 150[degrees]C, 200[degrees]C, 25[degrees]C, and 350[degrees]C) using a laboratory-scale platen press. The basis weight of these papers was around 80 g/[m.sup.2].
In this paper we summarize the results of dynamic sheet thickness and temperature measurements made while a sheet was undergoing wet pressing or impulse drying on an electrohydraulic platen press. We investigated the thermal and compression state of the sheet in order to gain insights into the dynamics of sheet heating and compression in an extended nip and to understand the physical mechanism inhibiting delamination in the decompression phase of a heated nip.
The volume begins and ends with a sense of how one person might do both: in the interview with Douglas Charles readers will gain a little bit of insight into what life is like for a journeyman printer in Alaska, and Charles's own research on the lost technology of the bed and platen presses of the nineteenth century closes the issue in a book review by Stephen Sword.